Essay On Anti War Movement

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The anti-war movement was a big conflict over the Vietnam War. A anti-war movement is a social movement, almost a nation's decision to carry or start an armed conflict. It could also mean pacifism which means you're against violence military force during a time of conflict or problems. One of the most times the anti-war movement was in full affect was during the 1960’s. Most of the supporters of the anti-war movement were college students, middle-class suburbs, labor unions, and government institutions. It gained a lot of supports and grabbed people's attention in 1965 and remained and fully peaked in 1968. It remained pretty powerful during the war and involved racial, cultural, and political spheres. It really changed American Society. In 1970 A tragic accident happened at kent state. 4 protesters were killed in a shooting these protesters were part of the anti war movement in 1970. These protesters were being peaceful when the military came up and shot them. …show more content…
It started as a small peace activist groups on college campuses but gained national prominence in 1965. This all started after the United States bombed North Vietnam. Anybody that supported the anti-war movement thought war was wrong and peace was needed in the war not violence. One of the most biggest protests against the Vietnam War took place at the Lincoln Memorial.

Around 100,000 protesters gathered at the Lincoln Memorial and later 30,000 marched to the pentagon. It was a brutal conflict between officials and U.S. Marshals that were protecting the buildings. Hundreds and hundreds of protesters were arrested and one of them even wrote a book called armies of the night. The anti-war movement got huge support from Martin Luther King Jr when he went public about his opinion on war. He was a supporter of the anti-war movement because of the funds of the war and how many african americans were being killed in the war as

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