Essay About Communication In The Great Gatsby

1008 Words 5 Pages
Communication is essential in nearly every person’s life, and many express themselves differently. The key is to be able to understand others and find meaning from their stories. One such story is The Great Gatsby, a novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald. It is narrated by Nick Carraway who introduces himself and some of his views on life in order to help the reader find meaning from the novel. In this passage, Fitzgerald characterizes Nick as opinionated and aware of everything around him by discussing Nick’s views of himself and views of others. In order to tell his story, Carraway first explains his background that has caused him to be the judgmental and observant man he is at the time of narration. He is very aware of many things about himself …show more content…
One very important relationship he has in his life is his relationship with his father, with whom he has “always been unusually communicative in a reserved way.” This reserved communication implies that Nick and his father always have more to say, they just refrain from stating it, mirroring the fact that Nick always has judgments, he just attempts to not show them. Consistent with the fact that Nick does not say everything on his mind when speaking with his father, Nick states that “young men” have “intimate revelations” that seem to be “plagiaristic and marred by obvious suppressions” when expressed. Describing these people as “young men” and not simply …show more content…
He knows from experience that all men are similar in the way they express themselves, but also is aware enough to know that each has different, less obvious, inner motives. In fact, Nick states that he was so privy towards the inner lives of his peers that he was “accused of being a politician” in college. Politicians are recognized as outwardly being accepting of others, however, they often judge others and may use mental baggage to their advantage. Nick then begins to describe Gatsby, a person who seems to defy Nick’s “unaffected scorn;” scorn which would be expected due to Gatsby’s “heightened sensitivity to the promises of life.” Carraway realizes that Gatsby is sensitive to events in life, but is also aware that he typically would judge people like Gatsby with contempt. This contrast of judgmental instinct and seemingly irrational curiosity is just one factor that causes Nick to be aware that he should not form harsh opinions but instead learn the complexities of those that he would normally have made quick conclusions. Carraway also distinguishes his calm observations from Gatsby’s “heightened sensitivity,” causing the readers to assume that nobody, including Carraway, has the same level of sensitivity, they simply observe. It is the events surrounding Gatsby that cause Nick to temporarily close out his interest in the “abortive sorrows and short-winded elations of men.”

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