The Impact Of Erikson's Psychosocial Theory On Development

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Erikson’s psychosocial theory implements the impact of several factors on development rather than just focusing on one. This theory is used to describe how certain individuals and experiences had an influence in molding me. The theory is being applied in my life to explain the formation of “trust” through my father’s care, “autonomy” through positive reinforcement, “guilt” caused by my aunt’s strictness, “industry” rooted from my strong focus on school from my preschool years, and “identity confusion” followed by “identity” (Santrock, 2015). In essence, this paper will go into depth about these events and how they impacted my development throughout the early stages.
Unfortunately, after I was born times were tough for my parents. It had been
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According to my mother, it was difficult for me to develop “autonomy” (Santrock, 2015, p. 20). Most of my siblings learned how to walk a little after their first year, but I started walking until I was two years old. My parents would always try to encourage me to walk, but they said that I always preferred crawling or did not move at all until I was carried by them. Considering this, it has not come to my belief that during this stage “shame and doubt” ruled over because I was never “punished too harshly” for not completing a task successfully (Santrock, 2015, p. 20). They always gave me a positive reinforcement whenever I failed in order to encourage me to try again. I was not being forced or rushed into learning how to walk. However, once I learned how to walk I was able to quickly pick up “toilet training” and eating on my own (“Erikson’s Psychosocial Stages Summary Chart,” 2016). Instead of depending on others, I was able to develop a sense of autonomy during this stage, which helped me take responsibility for my actions. On the contrary, had I not completed this stage successfully, then I would find myself blaming others for my faults such as clumsiness or inappropriate

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