Ericikson And Erikson's Stages Of Phychosocial Development

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Erik Homberger Erikson was born on June 15, 1902 in Frankfurt, Germany. Erikson’s Jewish mother Karla Abrahamsen and biological father an unnamed Danish man abandoned him before he was born. His mother married Dr. Theodor Homberger who would raise Erikson as his son. The family moved to Karlsruhe in southern Germany. Erikson officially changed his named to Erik Erikson when he became an American citizen. No one truly knows why he chose the name, Erikson. Early in Erikson’s education instead of focusing on chemistry and biology he studied art and many different languages. Erikson never cared for formal schooling and decided not to attend college. By the time Erikson graduated high school he wanted to become an artist. During the early 1920’s, …show more content…
Although Erikson was heavily influenced by Sigmund Freud, who believed that our personality was shaped by age five, Erikson believed that humans developed continued throughout their entire life span. Erikson went against Freud by crafting eight psychosocial stages of development. He believed that each stage presented a crisis that must be resolved before one can proceed to the next stage. These stages are trust versus mistrust, autonomy versus shame and doubt, initiative versus guilt, industry versus inferiority, identity versus role confusion, intimacy versus isolation, generatively versus stagnation, and integrity versus …show more content…
Despair, occurred during late adulthood. In this stage, the individual reflected on the past. The senior citizen tends to slow down in their productivity and explores life as a retired person. During this time that people contemplate their accomplishments and are able to develop integrity if they see themselves as leading a successful life. Erik Erikson believed if we see our lives as unproductive, feeling guilt about our past, or feels that we did not accomplish our life goals, then we become dissatisfied with life and develop despair, often leading to depression and hopelessness. However, success in this stage will lead to the virtue of wisdom which enables a person to look back on their life with a sense of closure and completeness, and also accept death without

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