Erich Maria Remarque's All Quiet

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Remarque wrote this novel as a therapeutic way of coping with the effects of World War I on him (Wagner 117). World War I left Remarque feeling alone and at loss of his self-identity. The horrifying experiences Remarque endured shattered his life; and because he went straight into the war after graduating high school, he had no past life to return back home to (Yearley 2136). Remarque felt as if though writing All Quiet would soothe away all they pain World War I left on him. The purpose of Remarque witting this novel was to help pay tribute to a generation of men who were mentally and physically destroyed by the war (Luckert 1227-1228). The main character, Paul Baumer, and Erich Maria Remarque are similar because of their experiences while in combat …show more content…
Paul Baumer is nineteen years old at the time he enlists into the German Army (Remarque 3). Paul and his classmates enlist into the war because they are persuaded by their school master, Kanteorek. Kantorek is among the veterans of the older generation who are to encourage young boys to join the German army. Kantorek, along with the adults in the boys’ lives, also made them feel as if though they were entitled to mature at an early age, join the war, and fight for their country. Among Paul’s classmates who enlist into the army is Joseph Behm (Remarque 11). Joseph is hesitant about joining the army, but eventually gives into Kantoreks constant pressuring (Remarque 11). Once in combat Joseph is one of the first to die, and his death is completely horrifying to his classmates (Remarque 12). Joseph’s death results in Paul and his classmates losing trust in authority figures, such as Kantorek (Remarque 12-13). The men look back on how they once idealized Kantorek but now despise him (Remarque 12). Paul and his classmates now blame Kantorek for pushing them into the army and introducing them to the horrors of war (Remarque

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