Dahl: Equality In The Democratic States

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In chapter 6, Dahl discusses some major topics about equality in regards to the government. Dahl debates the different equality as being self-evident, but people do not adopt it because opportunities are not equally distributed at birth. Certain circumstances and luck have compounded initial difference. A famous French writer was stupefied at the degree of social equality in the United States. Although, inequality appears to be a natural condition of humankind. Equality and inequality can take different meanings depending on the context in which it is used. Political equality in democratic states is not always interpreted as an express of factual judgment. It could be an express of moral judgment about human beings and what we believe must …show more content…
The government can be thought of just like humans. It is very difficult to give equal consideration of the people’s opinions, it is difficult not have some prejudice in decision making, to a certain degree. This is just human nature, as we can examine the various examples that Dahl gives throughout the chapter. The one way for us to reach more equality is through acceptability. This process requires consideration of all citizens’ opinion. Intrinsic equality is important foundation of a government because it allows equity among citizens by considering their interests and …show more content…
It is essential to have a balance of the two. Practical evidence is of course necessary, but it is not enough to make a political decision. The next point he discusses is that in order to govern a state, the government must have affirm resistance to all temptations of power. They must be dedicated to the public good rather than having intrinsic superiority. Dahl discusses this in chapter 6, it is human nature to act in such a way, but it is improper for a government to act in this way. That’s why they are “experts”, they must be able to have resistance from temptations. Some of the many advantages of having a democratic nation is that citizens are protected against dictatorial rulers, they are allowed political rights and freedoms. At the end of the chapter, Dahl concludes the first part of our readings, and explains the next part of the book, “We turn, then, from goals to actualities” (Dahl, Page

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