Essay on Epidemiology and Communicable Diseases: HIV

1263 Words Nov 26th, 2013 6 Pages
Epidemiology & Communicable Diseases
HIV or the Human Deficiency virus is like other viruses including the flu, but the one thing that makes this virus so different than any other is that the body is unable to clear this one out completely. Once someone is infected, there is no cure. Over time, HIV can also hide or mask itself in the body's cells. The cells within a person's body that fight off infection are called CD4 cells or T cells. HIV attacks these cells and copies or replicates itself inside these cells, then destroys them. HIV over time will destroy so many of these cells that the body is unable to fight off infection anymore. When this starts happening, AIDS or Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome happens which is the final stage
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The epidemiological triangle of HIV consists of three things: the person, the causative agent, or the environment (Smith, 169). The causative agent that causes AIDS is HIV or the virus itself. The host is a person in the case of HIV and the environment is the neither the host or the agent, but a factor that influences interaction between the two. The epidemiological triangle consists of three things: the person, the causative agent, or the environment (Smith, 169). In the triangle for HIV, the agent that causes AIDS is HIV or the virus. The host is a person in the case of HIV. The environment is neither the host nor the agent, but something that influences interaction between the two (Smith, 169). The host factors for HIV include age, sex, ethnic background, race, sexual orientation, education, and economic status (Smith, 169). The agent factors or causative agent for HIV are the virus itself and the mode of transmission, life cycle and virulence of the virus (Smith, 169). The environmental factors for HIV include social and economic considerations including family, community, political organization, public policy, regulations, institutions, workplace, occupation, economic status, technology, mobility, housing population density, attitudes, customs, culture, health practices, health services (Smith 169-170).
A community health nurse with an

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