Epictetus In The Civil War

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After years of civil war a young Octavian, finally restored order and stability on an exhausted Roman state. After his victory over Actium in 31 BC, Octavian found himself in control of the Roman Empire. The answer came in the first meeting of the senate when Octavian theatrically relinquished all his powers to the Roman Senate. In exchange for these powers Octavian received a new name, Augustus. In Discourses (III. Xiii. 9) Epictetus tells us, "For you see that Caesar appears to furnish us with great peace. There are no more enemies, nor battles, robbers, or pirates, but we can travel at every hour and sail from the rising sun to the setting." This is the beginning of the era known to historians as Pax Romana or Roman Peace. This period …show more content…
Augustus had no moralities about making and breaking alliances. Here was a man who could betray you as easily as befriend you and call you ally. Augustus’ callous deception allowed Rome to emerge from a viciously destructive period of civil war. Although one could argue that the ends justified the means, in the end, Augustus proceeded to twist the Roman Senate to his ideology. In 27 BC, the emperor’s a show of returning full power to the Roman Senate and renouncing his control of the Roman provinces. Under his consulship, however, the Senate had little power in introducing legislature by presenting bills for senatorial deliberation. In theory, the senate was to assist the emperor in matters of legislation, but in fact it was merely to support the tenders which he …show more content…
The civil wars had brought their religions to a state of deterioration. With the refurbishment of the old temples, he hoped to bring the people back to the worship of the ancient gods, discouraging the introduction of the foreign deities whose worship he claimed was immoral. He spread the belief that even a great Roman was an improved deity over the gods and goddesses of Syria and Egypt. With the challenge to reinstate the old Roman religion, he also desired to resuscitate the morality and of the past. In other words, through religion, he attempted to gain control of the people. Adding to this clandestine oppression, Augusts attempted to improve the laxity which had settled over Roman customs by introducing laws into marriage and divorce. He made adultery a criminal offense, and he encouraged the birthrate by granting privileges to couples with three or more children. To impose such will upon the citizens was no less than an act of sheer

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