Environmentalism And Green Capitalism

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World War II was an interesting era specifically for countries who already believed themselves to be industrialized. Post World War II, pushed American manufactures to a frenzy to produce the best products on the market. Although businesses began skyrocketing in profits, waste levels became an undeniable problem. Americans developed methods of disposal; however, in order to protect the environment more was needed than just disposal mechanisms. Since the 1950’s, American environmentalists introduced eco-friendly ideas; however, they came a long way in accepting green capitalism (eco-capitalism). Before environmentalists acknowledged the idea of green capitalism they experimented on some successful and non-successful methods. Some of which include …show more content…
In Gone Tomorrow: The Hidden Life Of Garbage, Heather Rogers explained the process of how this “green capitalism” was to be achieved. “…the goal is for individual companies to voluntarily back-engineer manufacturing so that wastes are designed out of the process; castoffs would... [be broken] down…into the natural environment or…recycled…in a nontoxic manner” (212). The only downside was that no small private company wants to voluntarily comply with ideas that may potentially hurt their business, even if it means dangerous changes to the environment. In other words, not everyone was on board to begin …show more content…
Thomas Friedman an American journalist described green technology as “the mother of all markets” (qtd. In ‘Green Capitalism’ or Environmental Justice? 1). Friedman was right, American businesses began to introduce technology that allowed individuals to take matters into their own hands. For example, solar panels are a great investment in the eyes of America. “The development of new sources of energy… [created] new markets…” (qtd. in ‘Green Capitalism’ or Environmental Justice? 1). That being said, saving the world from environmental destruction started to attract private businesses. In recent studies shown in an article by Jerry Harris “The ten largest PV manufacturers had 57% of the world market in 2007…while the average annual revenue produced per worker is…$300,000” (par. 27). Since then tons of companies began to invest in solar panels, which was only one of other innovations

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