Environmental Impacts Of The BP Oil Spill And Dust Bowl

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When looking at all of the environmental disasters of the United States, the BP Oil Spill and Dust Bowl are by far two of the most devastating disasters to the surrounding environment and ecosystem. Although both natural disasters have different characteristics and environmental effects, each disaster greatly impacted the surrounding ecosystems from before and after the disasters. Although the Gulf of Mexico before the BP oil spill was still known for its suffering under the effects of coastal erosion, hypoxia or very low oxygen, and harmful algal blooms, the Gulf was still a flourishing ecosystems where plants and animals and even human industries thrived. Most of the marine life in the Gulf of Mexico included small animals and plants that …show more content…
The commercial and recreational industry of the Gulf of Mexico was also a great economic benefit for humans. For example, in 2008, the commercial fisheries brought in $659 million in shellfish and finfish and was a great tourist site where three million people took fishing trips that same year. However, after the spill, the commercial industry suffered incredibly and many investments and revenue were lost as a result of the incredible harm done to the entire ecosystem of the Gulf of Mexico. When looking at the animals of the Gulf of Mexico, the immediate impacts of the BP oil spill caused oil to coat thousands of birds’ feathers and therefore hindered their ability to regulate their body temperature and therefore decreased their buoyancy. Many mammals also ingested the oil which caused internal bleeding and ulcers and the sea coral population greatly decreased even seven miles from the Deepwater Horizon …show more content…
Before the Dust Bowl, the Plains states were known for their open land potential after Congress passed the 1862 Homestead Act. Millions and millions of acres of wild grasslands covered the Great Plains and was home to many different species of animals such as bison, pronghorns, fox squirrels, great horned owls, sandpipers, barred tiger salamanders, and ornate box turtles. However, thousands and thousands of farmers soon came to the Great Plains regions in hopes of finding success through farming and the area soon became abundant in its ability to graze cattle and to harvest wheat. However, as the people of the Great Plains began to benefit from the area 's prosperity during the first few years of development, the plants and animals of the Great Plains began to suffer as well. Once the disaster occurred, thousands and thousands of farmers and families fell into poverty and were forced to leave their homes to find work elsewhere. Not only this, but the human population also suffered from eye and lung damage from the dust storms and suffered from asthma and other respiratory health issues. Those who lived in the area were often stranded during dust storms and their automobile and tractor engines were often ruined by grit. The high temperatures, strong winds, and dry region turned the Great Plains into a

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