Amazon Rainforestation Research

1265 Words 6 Pages
Widespread economic growth along with globalization have led to negative environmental impacts that are getting out of hand. Deforestation is occurring all over the world to make room for agriculture and plantations that are feeding the growing demand for products such as beef or palm oil. Forests have often been referred to as the “Earth’s lungs.” The reason for this is because of the forest’s ability to take in carbon dioxide from the world’s atmosphere and through the process of photosynthesis emit oxygen back into the air. Not only are forests responsible for the air we breath, but a majority of Earth’s fresh water. Forested watersheds generate more than three quarters of the world’s water. (Cho, 2014) So what’s the problem? Unfortunately, …show more content…
Biodiversity loss and environmental destruction spreads infectious disease by increasing species resiliency and interactions with humans (Harvard, 2016). Deforestation is also destroying the Amazon Rainforest and ruining the home of the world’s most endangered tribe, the Awá, along with many other native tribes (Chamberlain, 2012). Deforestation simulations have shown an increase in temperature and a decrease in rainfall, which cause desertification, soil erosion, and flooding (Lejeune, Davin, Guillod, & Seneviratne, 2015). Not to mention, forests are home to 80 percent of the world’s biodiversity. Deforestation is liable for the loss of 137 plant, insect and animal species daily (Cho, …show more content…
The Awá tribe that resides in the Amazon Rainforest sees the destruction deforestation causes first hand. The tribe not only relies on the rainforest for shelter, but food as well. To make matters worse, people known as pistoleras have been hired to hunt down and kill anyone in the Awá tribe that might stand in their way. Clearing the Awá of their land through the use of these armed loggers further benefits illegal logging industries. The Awá and other indigenous tribes are stakeholders for this deforestation policy, as their people, homes, and culture face extinction. It is clear that with all they have to gain from a decrease in deforestation, they would be for this policy. (Chamberlain,

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