Morrison's Use Of Language And Diction In Poetry

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The poet brings off his effects by a tactful restraint in his use of words. The poem moves forward because of the large amount of energetic verbs it has “thuds”, “smokes”, “hangs”, “stipples”, “lobs” and so on. Even a word like “feather” which is a noun is converted into a verb “feathers” which is an Augustan technique. Diction as employed by the Movement poets thus purifies the language while at the same time gives pleasure to the reader. Movement diction does not extend the range of language. It goes over already trodden ground, purifying and enlivening it. This humble purpose is steady with the Movement’s overall attitude of avoiding excess or adopting a pompous rhetorical tone. As Morrison notes: “Movement poetic practice is based on certain general principles about the origin, nature and function of poetry. These in term bespeak a different view of the poet—the poet as citizen concerned with social issues and politics. Poetry not only is made thing, it is a said thing and it is discourse” (Morrison 32).
Englandism, Provincialism Londonism:
The Movement Poets cultured Englandism, provincialism, regionalism and Londonism. John Press defined provincialism as: the poet who is primarily concerned with the values of his own cultural society, and who is largely indifferent to what lies beyond the world that knows at
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He also liked the insularity of Larkin. According to him: “contemporary England is a rich field of poetic subject” He further opines that contemporary conditions for the poetic subject were different from those of the past. He says: This is the poet who wants to see his writing not any longer as a historical, an ethical or a social activity but a metaphysical and ultimately, yes, a religious activity. What he wants to write are poems that express and nourish elation” (Davie, “England as a Poetic Subject”

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