Encourage The Golden Rule Of Organ Donations, Transplant Coverage Analysis

Superior Essays
Joseph S. Roth’s wrote an inspiring essay called “Encourage the Golden Rule of Organ Donations, Transplant Coverage,” that provides crucial information on the significance of organ donation. In the essay, Roth incorporates his proposal, the Golden Rule, which permits health insurers to limit transplant coverage for patients who refuse to be organ donors. The legislation would require insurance companies to provide information at each policy renewal about how their policy holders can register to become organ donors. This essay was impressive from the beginning with its unforgettable hook, a somber tone, and supportive evidence. The author hooks his readers from the start with a shocking story of a woman who suffered a stroke and had ideal organs to donate. Her husband, who was on a transplant list for a heart, refused to donate her organs. Roth then follows that story with one about a woman who received a kidney and years later when she died, her family refused to donate her organ. These two stories were good attention grabbers for the audience and intrigue readers to see what else will be mentioned in the essay. These stories also engage the reader's emotions and question what they would do in those situations. Roth then clarifies these cases are rare, but they do happen time to time. That statement gives the readers …show more content…
Four thousand transplant candidates are added to the national waiting list every month. On average seventy-seven people receive an organ and eighteen people die because the United States lacks the organs necessary for survival. To Roth, this is an unchangeable fact at this time because people fail to know the facts and statistics of organ transplants. When people understand the facts Roth thinks there will be a generous response. With Roth’s supportive essay tries to encourage readers to donate and help the less

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