Employees Resist Change Essay example

1145 Words Sep 25th, 2014 5 Pages
ATENEO DE DAVAO UNIVERSITY – SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND GOVERNANCE | Reaction Paper | FOR ADMINISTRATIVE PROCESSES AND ORGANIZATION BEHAVIOR SUBJECT |

Mariane P. Salmasan
10/21/2013
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Why Do Employees Resist Change

The normal and natural reaction to change is resistance. Every individual has a threshold for how much change they can absorb. This resistance is inevitable and that management must be prepared to respond to it.

In his article on why do employees resist change, Paul Strebel described that managers and employees view change differently. Both groups know that vision and leadership drive successful change, but far too few leaders recognize the ways in which individuals commit to change to bring it about. Managers see
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The employees’ loyalty and commitment is closely connected to their belief of their manager’s willingness to recognize good performance not only upon the revenue it will give the company. The manager’s sensitivity to this dimension is crucial to gaining commitment to new goals and changes implemented by the company. The last dimension is the social dimension through which employees gauge an organization’s culture. Employees note about what company says in its values, its mission and vision, and observe the interplay between the company practices and the management’s attitude towards these practices. Along this dimension, employees notice the rules that determine who gets what in the company. This dimension is often undermine by the management when change is initiated where in fact, it is the most important dimension as along this dimension when the management’s credibility is lost, it most difficult to recover.

The article sited examples of how important these three dimensions of personal compact in implementing changes in a company. One sample is the case at Philips Electronics that was based in the Netherlands wherein the employees resistance to change ultimately drove the company to the brink of bankruptcy. The problem was with the need to produce new products to market in a timely way the management needed some change to take place. In Philips’s 1989 annual report, van der

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