Essay On Holocaust Survivors

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Many things have emotionally affected the Survivors of the Holocaust, something that affected them the most was being liberated by Jewish soldiers. This paper explains emotions of the survivors and liberators and how it affects them today. How liberators feel emotionally as the released and saved people from concentration and death camps. That the survivors still feel like they are living in the camps emotionally. Survivors respond when being severed or waiting in line. The feeling of the children of the survivors feel from everything they have been told by their parents. People suffer from PTSD following the Holocaust. The feelings about being placed in the Displaced Person’ Camps. Things similar now back to the camps emotionally. The difference …show more content…
“Survivors who develop PTSD in response to Holocaust experiences may pass on vulnerability to the same condition to their children,” (1). The children of Holocaust survivors may deal with this trauma because of an experience with a parent or it may be passed down from their parent. Next, the author is talks about other mental disorders survivors, survivor’s children, and the grandchildren of survivors could possibly have. Some being survivor guilt, melancholia, identification with the dead, seperation anxiety, and aggression problems. Then Fara Kaplan states “The various effects that adults who were child survivors experience can be attributed to many aspects of their traumatic exposure,” (1). Children survivors react differently to being a survivor. What Fara Kaplan is trying to say adults got treated one way while children got treated another and which is reflected in their personal lives. As they got older it became more prominent in them. Finally, being in the Holocaust it has it’s own tolls on you with how your mental

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