Love In 'Pride And Prejudice'

1176 Words 5 Pages
Mind over Matter In Pride and Prejudice, feelings, whether based upon character or lust, outweigh material considerations in terms of motivation for marriage. Jane Austen illuminates this through a range of successful and failed marriages. Charlotte’s acceptance of Mr. Collins 's proposal is one of the only instances in which feelings are not the primary motivation for marriage. In an unbelievably quick change of heart, Mr. Collins proposes to Charlotte the day after his persistent, failed proposal to Elizabeth. Charlotte and Mr. Collins marry despite Mr.Collins unlikeable character and previous interest in Elizabeth On Elizabeth’s visit to the newlyweds she notices,“When Mr.Collins could be forgotten, there was really a great air of …show more content…
Charlotte clearly prefers time away from her husband; she shows no signs of excessive attachment to him. Although, Mr. Collins and Charlotte merely coexist without showing much affection or romanticism towards one another, the pair creates an atmosphere which is not only tolerable, but advantageous for both of them. On one hand, Mr.Collins meets Lady Catherine’s expectations of having a woman of the house, and on the other hand Charlotte is made a respectable woman. Before marrying Mr. Collins, Charlotte was at risk of becoming an old maid and thus having a meaningless life in the eyes of society. The correlation between a meaningful, respectable life and marriage stems from marriage being viewed as the only acceptable option for a lady at this time. In contrast to the lack of physical attraction between Charlotte and Mr.Collins, Lydia and Wickham’s marriage is motivated primarily by lust. From the beginning of the novel, it is evident Lydia holds the same belief as her mother that marriage is the ultimate goal for a young lady. This is seen in her and Kitty’s obsession with the officers. “Their visits to Mrs. Phillips were now productive of the most …show more content…
Darcy and Elizabeth, “It ought to be so; it must be so, while he retains the use of his reason. But your arts and allurements may, in a moment of infatuation, have made him forget what he owes to himself and to all his family. You may have drawn him in,”(337). Lady Catherine is in an inner turmoil as the view of maintaining social hierarchies within marriage, which she holds so highly are brought into question in front of her very eyes. She tries to reckon with this discrepancy by assuming infatuation. In her mind, it is impossible for marriage, to be born from vastly different economic and social backgrounds. Even a courtship of such beginnings would breach societal norms of the time. Nevertheless, Mr.Darcy disregards Lady Catherine’s desire for him to marry her niece. His feelings also prevail over Elizabeth’s poor economic situation and the lack of civility in her sisters and mother. Elizabeth’s feelings have a similar journey of overcoming obstacles. At first, she refuses to believe Mr. Darcy’s feelings could be so persistent as to survive her rejection of his proposal, EVIDENCE In light of Elizabeth’s resignation and depression, Jane calmly states,‘“I think you are in very great danger of making him as much in love with you as ever,’”(323). Ultimately, Jane is right as Elizabeth and Mr.Darcy’s feelings triumph culminates in a successful

Related Documents