Social Work Case Study Suzanne Hardetty

1216 Words 5 Pages
Two social workers from the Special Education Treatment Center for Emotionally Disturbed Children were assigned to the cases of Suzanne and Cindy. Suzanne and Cindy have been living in a group home for two years. Cindy is a 3-year-old girl and Suzanne’s younger sister. Suzanne is a 7-year-old girl who has been diagnosed with attachment disorder. Suzanne has been seeing a caseworker twice weekly for the past eight months. Suzanne’s treatment involves individual psychotherapy. Parental rights for both Suzanne and Cindy are in the process of being terminated. As a result of this, alternatives for long-term placement are being explored. The social workers of the two girls have been talking about putting them up for adoption. The social workers …show more content…
Foster (2001) states, “siblings are required to be placed together whenever possible…If …siblings ‘have to be placed in different homes, they are devastated. They worry all the time…I think there’s a hole in their hearts’” (p. 17). Suzanne’s social worker has to keep this in mind at the time she/he would make the decision because that decision could change Suzanne 's life and could benefit or complicate her disorder. Suzanne’s social worker has the obligation to advocate for her well-being as the AATBS (2016) states “‘case advocacy’ (or “client advocacy”) is a form of advocacy that involves working with and on behalf of an individual to ensure he/she receives the service and benefits to which he/she is entitled and the services are delivered in a way that protects his/her dignity” (p.45) As Suzanne cannot make her own decisions because she is a minor, the social worker has to decide for her without forgetting Suzanne’s needs. That is why the decision that the social worker might take might compromise her/his ethical responsibility of providing good …show more content…
According to Child Welfare Information Gateway (2013), “sibling relationships are emotionally powerful and critically important not only in childhood but over the course of a lifetime…Children learn social skills, particularly in sharing and managing conflict, from negotiating with brothers and sisters. Sibling relationships can provide a significant source of continuity throughout a child’s lifetime and are likely to be the longest relationships that most people experience” (p. 4). Leaving Suzanne and Cindy together could bring an opportunity to continue with their sibling

Related Documents