Emotional Conflict In The Chief's Daughter By Flora Nwapa

911 Words 4 Pages
Some could say the word, “family” means: support, love, joy, and protection. While others would say pain, anger, and agony. People's view of the term, “family” is often due to the their relationships with either their sibling(s), parents, or even spouse. Conflicts within a relationship are common around the world as people have different points of view. The Chief’s Daughter by Flora Nwapa, discusses the bond between a father and daughter who seem to have various points of view of the world. The author explores the idea of cultural clash and generational conflict, as well as displaying traits that help symbolize these themes. The Chief is a devoted father who only wants the best for his daughter. He plans a future for her and decides to follow …show more content…
In his opinion, he feels like his sons are not worthy enough to take over his company. However, he decides that Adaeze is the finest successor to his company and that she is to stay at home and bear his children. Despite her father’s plans, Adaeze is already engaged to Ezente (a member of another Nigerian clan) and is soon to have his child. The conflict between Adaeze and the Chief mainly portray the theme of cultural clash as it can defined as tradition vs. modernization. The Chief’s plan for Adaeze to bear his children is an old traditional practice in Nigeria, which has faded away over the years. Although the Chief only wants what’s best for his daughter, his idea is flawed because he only cares about himself and does not understand about how Adaeze would feel. Despite her father’s plans, Adaeze does not seem to comply with her father’s way and remains strong-willed. Moreover, the author portrays her as a modern woman who has learned the ways from the “land of the white” and prefers to choose her own future. She says, “Father, I demand to know whether you married my mother or not. I am not your wife, and I am not your son.” (Nwapa, 4) It is quite evident that Adaeze expresses her thoughts clearly and shows the key difference between modernization and tradition. She seems to understand her father’s motive, but still refuses and has already made up her …show more content…
A month ago, I was in India, in a town called Kuttippuram, where I visited my grandparents whom I haven’t seen for three years. They were presumably shocked to see how much I’ve grown and they were also surprised to see my attire. I would remember them looking at my jeans and ask, “isn’t that uncomfortable to wear?” I would reply by shaking my head to indicate a “no,” and then found myself often reflecting on how my culture is contrasting to my grandparents. My grandparents prefer to follow tradition, whereas, I follow numerous other values, thus representing modernization. I also believe that I represent the younger generation because my point of view is disparate compared to my grandparents. My grandparents are conservative and do not go well with change, on the contrary, I believe that I am more open-minded and that I have a natural tendency to adapt and to learn new

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