Organizational Barriers In Surgery

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Organisational Barrier
Organisational barriers in a surgery can be defined as 'Practices within the surgery or organisation that prevents people from accessing a service (Classroom Notes, 2014).
One example of this barrier could be the surgery not having waiting rooms with accessible for wheelchair user or they make the patients with wheelchair to wait in another room. This could lead to the patient feeling disempowered and as a result the patient may not attend appointments and not see a doctor until their illness has progressed to a stage where the doctor can do little about it. A GP surgery could overcome this barrier by providing waiting rooms accessible for wheelchair user so they feel equal to other patients and not feel self-conscious
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Not everybody has the same attitude towards health and some people don’t want to see the doctor even when the need is there. Some people may feel embarrassed or indifferent’ (Classroom Notes, 2014).
An example of this barrier could be a patient who is suffering from severe depression and will not leave the house due to their illness. The patient may not feel confident about themselves and their illness stops them from being seen in public. This could lead to the patient having low self-confidence and self-worth and so they will stop attending appointments and not being treated which could lead to their problem getting worse. For example, if the patient has had a bad cough for a few weeks and will not go to the GP surgery because of their depression, the cough could lead to something more serious like a chest infection. Moreover, if the patient never goes to the doctor they will be unaware of health promotions and information which could help them get treatment for their depression. This could be overcome by a GP surgery by ensuring a support worker comes to the patient house to work on the patient’s depression and low self-confidence. This could make the patient feel more comfortable attending appointments as it is allowing them to have an
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Studies say that Women prefer female intimate care by percentages from 50% to 70% with most of the rest having no preferences and there is still evidence that 30% to 50% of men prefer male. As patients want the same sex professionals and if the GP surgeries don’t provide this then, this could lead to low self-confidence and as a result patients may not want to see the doctor and so not attend appointments and therefore increase the rate of illness and disease. A GP surgery could overcome this barrier by employing both genders as doctors and giving the patient an option on which doctor they want to see. Also by not judging a patient if they ask to not see a certain doctor but respecting their decision (Kevinmd,

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