Emmeline Pankhurst's Suffrage

Decent Essays
Emmeline Pankhurst (1858-1928) was born in Moss Side, Manchester. In fact, it is her birth certificate, which states so; else she believed that she was born a day earlier on Bastille Day (The National Celebration) that had a special influence on her life. She was a British political activist, leader of the suffragette movement and was the major contributor in helping women to win the right to vote. She was born and brought up by her politically active parents in England. Out of ten children she was the eldest among all the five sisters and the most intelligent among all children but unfortunately she faced gender-discrimination in her own house. Being the victim of the prevailing patriarchal society where education of boys was considered more …show more content…
She was named as one of the hundred most important people of the 20th century, as “she shaped an idea of women for our time; she shook society into a new pattern from which there could be no going back” (Warner 1). She was involved with Women’s Franchise League, which advocated suffrage for women. She also worked as a poor law guardian and was shocked by the harsh conditions she encountered in the workhouses. She was the founder of the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU)—a women suffrage organization which was dedicated to “deeds, not words” (18). She was awarded The Holloway Medal (Imprisonment Medal) in …show more content…
It also unravels systematically the patriarchal society and the unending discrimination and sufferings that women have undergone through ages. At a very young age, the sense of right and wrong was inculcated inside Pankhurst. She was aware of the fact that she along her sisters were discriminated against by their brothers who represented the patriarchal mindset. Nevertheless, she firmly believed that she would work relentlessly to end such discrimination and to fight against the injustice which every girl or woman has to face in her family as well as in the society at large. It is a highly inspiring text the way Pankhurst fought on behalf of the women of her country to achieve equal status in the society and uproot the discrimination based on gender. Further, the most important part of the book is that, it encouraged the women from every nook and corner of the country to come forward and show their resentment against inequality and injustice thereby becoming active members of the suffrage movement. Maya Angelou (1928-2014) was born in St. Louis Missouri to Bailey Johnson and Vivian Johnson. She spent her childhood in Stamps, Arkansas when the community was racially marginalized. She was honored by universities, literary organizations, government agencies

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Betty Friedan Feminism

    • 1438 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Daughters of unhappy women read the book and finally understood their mother 's’ actions. People were so heavily affected by the book that they wrote to Friedan, expressing their gratitude to Friedan for helping them understand themselves. The Feminine Mystique started the Women’s Movement– women all over the country were realizing how unfairly they had been treated and how much more life has to offer for them. People started campaigning and protesting to end workplace discrimination and make anti-discrimination laws. From reading the book, women had the courage to leave unhappy marriages, get reeducated, look for jobs, explore their lifelong interests, and gain independence from the stereotype that was restricting their opportunities.…

    • 1438 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Women's Movement

    • 952 Words
    • 4 Pages

    This influenced feminist leaders to take a stand and raise awareness among women who were living in a time of social injustice, gender discrimination and political inequalities with in their society. A very well-known example of a liberal feminist was Betty Friedan. She was most recognized for her Feminine Mystique, published in 1963. This highlighted the gender discrimination among women. Ross (1993, pg 13) “The problem lay buried, unspoken, for many years in the minds of…

    • 952 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    One example of pathos is when the author states, “Poor white women needed to help support their families. Unmarried immigrant women arrived looking for work and a place to live.” This use of pathos is important to the overall passage because it fills the reader with a sense of sympathy toward the women during the civil war. It shows that they had to fight for themselves, and that change was necessary and bound to happen, or else the women would have had miserable lives for a lengthy amount of time. Another example of pathos in the article is when she is talking about the female reformers. “These forward thinkers risked being abandoned by their families and ridiculed by neighbors.…

    • 1000 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Anthony’s numerous accomplishments in pioneering the women’s rights movements validate her worthiness of a place in the U.S. Hall of Fame. To sum up, she has spearheaded a nationwide movement that forever altered the course of American history. She retaliated against the unjust and unconstitutional laws that oppressed women, displaying tremendous courage and leadership. Additionally, Anthony fought for the rights of African Americans, defying all societal norms and facing great opposition. Through her sacrifices for the equality of all, her determination and benevolence is apparent.…

    • 1747 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    She could easily be considered the “Mother of Women’s Suffrage.” We need people like Anthony to continue to protest for their beliefs of equality. Society heavily benefitted from her because she made history with her countless campaigns to protest inequality. She empowered so many others to assist with her journey for equality. From the point in her life where she first met Elizabeth Stanton, to when she was indicted for voting illegally she influenced the lives of every woman interested in a reform for women’s…

    • 1272 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Latina Feminism Movement

    • 1814 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The ladies would create an international awareness of the violence against women. The issue would be treated with great magnitude nationally and internationally. That attached more meaning to their fight against gender violence that was greatly rampant from their husbands. The ladies Feminism movement would still forcefully and publicly rebuke the presence and the persistence of the patriarchy. Male chauvinism and dominance in the spheres of life would be constantly challenged by the movement (Henold, 2008).…

    • 1814 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    "Men, their rights, and nothing more; women, their rights, and nothing less." (Susan B. Anthony). This quotation describes Anthony's attitude towards women's rights. Anthony helped the women all around the world by creating, innovating and illuminating. This woman's rights activist created the National Woman Suffrage Association, used Persisting and Striving for Accuracy to innovate ways to overcome a world without gender equality, and illuminated the world by helping give it a woman suffrage amendment.…

    • 787 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Starting in the mid-1800s a revolutionary movement began to root itself among the American population and other cultures around the world, Women’s Rights. In the push to raise awareness of the oppression of women and the inequality of sexes women traveled the country speaking to anyone that would listen. Two women stand apart in the effectiveness and remembrance of the speeches, as well as their leadership positions and impact they left on the nation in the development of equality. In the early years of this fight for women’s suffrage small conventions were held such as the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848, where a leading reformer Elizabeth Cady Stanton spoke to an eager crowd of women and men following women 's rights. This movement led to a similar women and friend of Stanton, Susan B. Anthony to travel a’ nd speak as well, most famously her address on women 's Right to vote of 1873 describing her experience and beliefs.…

    • 1539 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Women In The Iliad

    • 893 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Before the 1800’s, the idea of women being seen a property was improved very gradually. However, the nineteenth century was a major turning point for women politically, for this era was known as the “Women Suffrage Movement”. Women all around the nation fought for the right to vote, a distinct privilege for citizens, so they were ultimately fighting for an active citizenship in the United States. Through protesting, campaigning, and working masculine jobs while the me were fighting in World War I, women were given their right to vote by the ratification of the 19th Amendment. This amendment was an enormous change for the value of the female race in America, for women were now seen as equal citizens to…

    • 893 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    One woman decided to challenge this long accepted truth that a woman’s place was in the home. Betty Friedan’s publication of her forward thinking book, The Feminine Mystique, sparked a revival of feminist culture that was once so passionate during the early 20th century campaigns for women’s suffrage. The book posed the famous question to women across America: “Is this all?” Readers of the book exposed themselves to the unnamed problems they faced and realized they could do something about. Feminist leaders of the 1960s, including Friedan, helped bring awareness to the inequality American women faced, and helped shape the second wave of feminism that would bring down the barrier between…

    • 1760 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays