Embodiment Of Dharma In Ramayana

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Rama is the human embodiment of Vishnu, one branch of the trinity that makes up one “Supreme God.” The purpose of this character in the Ramayana is to vanquish the evil that has bombarded the world; this book characterizes Rama as “a savior” (Narayan 13). When deciding who to appoint as his successor, King Dasaratha concludes that Rama is the best choice because he surpasses all, being “the embodiment of perfection” (Narayan 14). Evidently, Rama cares deeply for all people, displaying no signs of partiality, but rather “has the same consideration for everyone” (Narayan 14). As a result, his subjects cared deeply for Rama, declaring that they “lack nothing” under his and Dasaratha’s rule (Narayan 6). This entirely perfect man serves as a model …show more content…
The Ramayana gives examples of upstanding characters who are exemplary models remaining faithful to one’s dharma. This story essentially gives those reading it a template to follow in order to become good people. This notion of keeping faithful to one’s dharma is a means of sustaining peace in a society. Striving to be faithful to one’s dharma means striving to live a fully good life, caring for other people, being selfless, etc. Theoretically, if everyone strove to live in this way, peace would be sustained and society would run smoothly. The character Rama illustrates a man who fulfilled all that was requisite of his dharma. When his rightful kingship is stolen from him, he humbly respects the wishes of his mother and retreats into the forest (Narayan 54). While seemingly perfect in all his ways, Rama does commit something which violates the concept of dharma. When Rama attacks Vali, the nature of this action calls into question his righteousness (Narayan 101). However, this section seems to be one of the few examples where Rama displays his humanity. By infringing upon his typically strong moral and courageous conduct, the reader sees that Rama is capable of making mistakes. As the story goes on Rama goes on to vanquish the ultimate evil, Ravana (Narayan 147), and was able to attain his place as king. His shortcomings paired with his ultimate determination to be faithful to his dharma …show more content…
Overall, their purpose is to bring about or perpetuate conflict. When Rama is named King Dasaratha’s successor, one of Dasaratha’s wives, Kaikeyi, is convinced by her handmaiden that the annunciation is unjust. Deciding that she has been cheated, Kaikeyi forces her husband to crown her son king and exile Rama (Narayan 43). The way in which this was brought about depicts women in an unflattering light. When Kaikeyi is upset at her husband, she retreats into the “room of anger” (Narayan 40). Essentially, she persuades her husband to do as she wants by throwing a tantrum (literally laying on the floor as a child might) and threatening suicide (Narayan 41). Her desire for her son to become king ultimately results in the death of her husband (Narayan 55), and the estrangement of two sons (Narayan 61). The immaturity demonstrated in Kaikeyi is not linked solely to her character, but is also evident in the character Sita. When she is nearly refused ownership of a beautiful, golden deer, Sita becomes sullen, “annoyed and irritated” (Narayan 83). Her desire of this deer, however, was used as a means for Ravana to steal Sita away. Women in this story are used to illustrate correct and incorrect behavior. Sita, intended to be the model of the ideal woman, remains faithful to her husband and stand by him in his exile, yet she is punished throughout the story, falling subject to its poor

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