Emancipated Women In The Great Gatsby Analysis

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A common misconception in our society is that people assume feminists believe women are superior to men. Feminism means gender equality, both in social and economic concerns. In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s book, The Great Gatsby, the main female characters presented in the book are all oppressed in their own ways. Daisy Buchanan and Myrtle Wilson are two main characters that are oppressed by society and the patriarchy that became the norm. With Daisy’s appearance and weakness representing the stereotypically feminine figure, she conforms to society to keep herself safe and keep her pure image. Opposing Daisy’s role as a proper lady, Tom represents a stereotypical masculine, strong, abrasive male. Back in the roaring twenties, women were considered …show more content…
She is incredibly influenced by the belief created by systematic oppression. Her dependance on wealth caused her to end up losing all affection towards her husband, George, and led her towards her toxic relationship with Tom. As Ivan Strba said in “Emancipated Women of The Great Gatsby”, “She desires Tom because of his bulky masculinity and his social style, and in a way her sexuality is a counterpart of Gatsby’s romantic passion for Daisy” (Strba 43) Tom physically abused her, using his power to take complete control. “Making a short deft movement Tom Buchanan broke her nose with an open hand. Then there were bloody towels upon the bathroom floor, and women’s voices scolding, and high over the confusion a long broken wail of pain.” (Fizgerald …show more content…
This is better explained with Myrtle, Daisy and Tom’s relationship with each other. Tom’s dominance is a key factor to the lack of feminine power in the story. The abusiveness of his nature, his constant need to be in control, and the way he treats others is a key factor in the story’s oppression of women. Also, Daisy’s awareness of her place in society is one of the most eye-opening factors of the book. The fact that she knows exactly what she’s doing when she gives up Gatsby to be with Tom and keep her wealth is a sign of oppression. In conclusion, Daisy and Myrtle are both representations of some of the worst times for women in the early twentieth century. As Daisy said in the past, all the women could really be in this book is a beautiful little

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