Elizabeth Proctor Character Analysis

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Abigail’s character is divided when considering the superego, id, and ego. She represents the id more than the other two. In fact, she has an absence of the ego and the superego. She acts upon her desires: to force John Proctor to love her. Any conscience-stricken person would realize that their lies have caused serious consequences, but Abigail fails to acknowledge this. She continues to lie to the town and the authority to receive what she wants. Even if she did not realize that her action would have such horrendous effects in the beginning, she continued to lie to save herself and her desire after people started being executed. Her desire is expressed in the first act when she is alone with proctor. Abigail states that she has a burning …show more content…
Her character represents a divided one, where the superego dominates the id and the ego. She is most likely the most sane, driven character throughout the play because she is practical. She realizes the wrongdoings of her husband, John Proctor, but does not desire to take revenge or anything of the sort. Although most people who be outraged by the fact that their significant other had an affair, Elizabeth stays calm and understanding. She expressed those feelings to John in act two when she told Proctor, “I do not judge you…I never thought you but a good man… only somewhat bewildered” (Miller 55). Elizabeth knows that all humans make mistakes and their extents vary, and accepts the sin Proctor committed. Also, she knows her place in society and does not transcend her authority. She stays bound to the Puritan rules when committing every day actions, which is a sign of the superego because she does not take action upon what she so much desires. Not only is she loyal to her husband, even after the affair, but she is greatly religious. This is demonstrated when she is asked if she knew her commandments, which she did (66). This was important to the Puritan beliefs during this time period; thus, by being confident with her commandments, Elizabeth stands her place in her …show more content…
He is guilty of his affair with Abigail; however, he is stumped when trying to save both Abigail and Elizabeth. In act one, during his private conversation with Abigail, he is very timid when approaching and condoning Abigail. However, towards the end, he does stand up for what he believes is right. “I will cut off my hand before I’ll ever reach for you again” (Miller 23). A couple lines down, when Abigail insults his wife, Elizabeth, he rises in anger to defend her (23). This would most definitely support the superego since he knows that his past affair was immoral. Yet, Proctor then comes across a dilemma. When Marry Warren comes home from court, she tells Proctor that Elizabeth has been accused of witchcraft. Elizabeth hears of this and demands that he go to court to tell the authorities the private conversation when Abigail admitted that she was lying. Proctor admits that he cannot tell the authorities that because he would hurt Abigail (61-62). He is torn because he does not know whether to tell the court about the lies and hurt Abigail and save his wife, or not tell and hurt his wife but save Abigail. This tells one that he has a conscience, which would demonstrate the superego, but he also has a desire to save both women, which would support the id. Overall, Proctor demonstrates the ego because knows what is right and what is wrong, but is driven

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