Elizabeth Cady Stanton: Politics And Women

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In the early nineteenth century, the words “politics” and “women” were in their own separate categories. For white middle-class Americans, Politics was entitled to males in the public sphere, while women’s place was in the private sphere, taking care of their children at home. It wasn’t until the rise of an ideology called “Republican motherhood” where, for the first time, women were allowed to be politically aware in order to educate their children about politics. However, women were still restricted within their homes and could not be outspoken, but “Republican motherhood” would spark the inspiration that would empower women to achieve a greater role in society. One significant who was enabled to achieve a greater role for women in her era …show more content…
The “Declaration of Sentiments” was, “Stanton’s indictment of the relations between men and women in her society” and claimed,” That all men and women are created equal” (Kerber, Dayton, and Hart 264). Stanton’s address was making a case that women were also human and were entitled to the same natural rights that only men were privileged with. Women in this generation were underprivileged in comparison to men; women, “had no voice in the making of laws, she was deprived of other rights of citizenship, she was declared civilly dead upon marriage” (Kerber, Dayton, and Hart 261). It was unheard of for a woman to be speaking in the public sphere, especially while speaking about the topic of politics. Men in this era would ridicule women who voiced their opinion publicly because there was a fear that women could become politically equal if they spoke out. Stanton also addressed woman’s suffrage in her speech, claiming, “That it is the duty of the women of this country to secure themselves their sacred right to the elective franchise” (Kerber, Dayton, and Hart 266). Stanton’s speech highlighted the grievances of women, and in the process, portrayed her ability to think rational and speak publicly like a man. Many papers across the nation attacked or ridiculed the participants and most ministers “condemned the Seneca …show more content…
Stanton chose to be involved in politics when she organized the Seneca Falls convention; politics were considered strictly for the rational males, not the emotional woman. Stanton chose to enter the strictly male public sphere when she delivered the “Declaration of Sentiments” Speech in front of many men and women and rationally supported her demands. Stanton also challenged the prominent cultural ideologies of gender in her era by denouncing the idea of “separate spheres.” Elizabeth was an unusual woman outside of her group because a “real” woman in this era was considered to be calm, fashionable, and domestic, not outspoken, political, and rational. In theory, Stanton was portraying the characteristics of a man in her time, so many disapproved of her. Nonetheless, Stanton’s opposition of these cultural ideologies is remarkable because she sparked the mass movement for woman’s rights (Kerber, Dayton, and Hart 262). Over the last 150 years feminists have organized, petitioned, and marched to overcome the injustice, and finally resolved all of the grievances and issues listed at the Seneca Falls, including the right to vote (Kerber, Dayton, and Hart 263). To conclude, Stanton was revolutionary model for women because exhibited that laws and cultural philosophies can be changed, as long as women were willing to work hard and come together just like our

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