Elie Wiesel's Life

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Elie Wiesel was born in 1928 in a small town in Romania. He and his family felt right at home surrounded by a highly populated Jewish community. Wiesel lead a privileged life, centered around education and religion. That is, until the Nazi soldiers came to collect him, along with his family and friends as a teenager. The gathered Jewish people from his community were sent to Auschwitz Concentration Camp where many devastating events took place in the life of Wiesel and thousands of other Jews. Wiesel later moved to do incredible things, surviving the camp, writing dozens of successful poems and books, and becoming a social rights advocate around the world. (Berenbaum, n.p) His course through life influenced all of his writings, and impacted …show more content…
In his most famous poem Wiesel writes “never shall I forget those flames that consumed my faith forever” (Wiesel n.p) Growing up Wiesel’s favorite area of study was religion. Religion was a very important part of his family 's everyday life. He had once said that he always looks forward to the Sabbath and as a young boy, often read religious texts. (Berenbaum). The loss of religion was a serious issue for Wiesel. We know that a tragic event like this would shape his writings greatly. The poem this line is pulled from, “Never Shall I Forget” uses an extreme amount of repetition to prove that the Holocaust is a lasting event that will forever be on Elie Wiesel’s mind. The line “Never shall I forget” is used several times throughout the poem and expresses extreme relation to the events he has faced. The loss of his faith is so prominent that he will never forget it and he wants his readers to know by including repetition. Also included in his poem, is the line “The moment which murdered my God” (Wiesel n.p). Wiesel and many others had been tormented for their beliefs for several years whilst in Auschwitz. To have something you believe in so passionately to be taken away from you in an instant by people of the greater power, would be very traumatic. Again the literary device of repetition is used in the poem to express this traumatic …show more content…
He realizes the efforts that Hitler went through to devise the Jewish Holocaust. Later in his life, he writes “Hate is an action. Hate takes time. Hate takes energy. And even it demands sacrifices.” (Wiesel n.p). The influence of his writing is the realization that hatred was so effective it killed millions of people in a short period of time. He realized how powerful this could be, and how powerful human action could be to change that. He is able to define hate as a human action because he had experienced it to the point where his ideals can no longer be biased. Human action can be described as poetic justice or rather poetic injustice in this case. Hatred has a negative cognition to it, but was unjustly rewarded. The Nazi’s could be seen as rewarded for their actions (imprisoning the Jews) while the Jews were being punished for practicing their religion.. Wiesel knew this to be an unfit retribution or reward for their actions. Through poetic justice, he could express that. Wiesel also wrote; “But indifference to hatred is encouraging hatred.” (Wiesel n.p). The reader can infer here that Wiesel was hoping during his time in the concentration camp that someone would be able to stand up to the Nazis and come rescue him and his fellow captives, much like the American soldiers did later in his life. Through this hoping, Wiesel was able to learn that human action can make a

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