Elie Wiesel Loss Of Innocence Quotes

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Loss of innocence affects people in the way they view the world. World War II, the era of Holocaust takes place in Europe when the Nazi party begins its systematical murder of millions of European Jew. Nazis set up numerous concentration camps, forces Jews out of their homes and separate families away to be sent to the camps. The reality of the cruel world is exposed to the vulnerable victims, children, as the misery of the Jewish nation takes away their innocence. A victim of the Holocaust, Elie Wiesel, writes a book called Night based on his experience with his father in the Nazi concentration camps in 1944 to 1945.The abrupt invade of German Nazis disrupts Elie’s teenage life by forcing him and his father to separate with rest of the family. …show more content…
Elie feels betrayed by God as he watches the Jews forgives the God that allowed Jews to die in despair. This shows Elie’s loss of religion and trust in God’s kindness and justice. On the day of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, Elie observes religious acts of Jews to bless the God and entreats for justice. However, Elie refuses to bless the God “who chose us among all nations to be tortured day and night, to watch as our fathers, our mothers, our brothers end up in the furnaces”(Wiesel 67). Elie’s image of God disfigures as he feels betrayed by God because God allows the Nazis to throw thousands of Jews into “the furnaces”. Elie, who has seen people forced into the crematory, has to bear the inhumanity of the Nazis. Being in shock of the horrifying scene, Elie expresses anger towards God, who “watches” the dying Jews in silence. Elie held God responsible because he naively believes that God should not let the suffering of Jews continue. Seeing God turning against the Jews, he losses hopes on the awaiting justices for the Jewish nation and thinks that it is pointless in blessing God’s name when God is doing nothing but letting the Jews die in misery. Elie’s loss of devotion to God soon developed into a motive to rebel against God. Days after Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, or the Day of Atonement, also the day when God decides people’s fate. Fasting is a tradition all Jews followed as it shows that they …show more content…
As Elie watches the endless torture and deaths around him, he begins to feel indifferent about the idea of dying. After watching the prisoner get hanged for stealing during the air raid, Elie’s senses were overcome by hunger, he did not feel sad, and he could only recall the sweet taste of the soup the night the prisoner was hanged. The prisoners surround themselves with the dead boy, “and stared at his extinguished eyes, the tongue hanging from his gaping mouth. The Kapos forced everyone to look at him squarely in the face[...] I remembered that on that evening, the soup tasted better than ever”(Wiesel 63). Being “forced” to witness death, the prisoners are used to seeing deaths, even though it is painful to watch. It shows that the inhumanity that has taken in on every one of them, desensitizing their senses and emotions, even upon the sight of one’s death. Only recalling the “taste” of the soup after witnessing a death, Elie feels desensitized about death because he has lost the ability to feel emotions and could only think of taking care of his prior needs. Another instance suggesting that Elie is desensitized is when the Kapos forced the Jews to run under the harsh condition in winter. People who could not keep up were trampled under thousands of feet of their own people. Elie meets a Polish boy named Zalman, who also was killed when he fails to keep up with Elie. Elie

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