Elephant In The Room Essay

Decent Essays
Source A-
The elephant in the room: How contraception could save future elephants from culling
By- Rose Eveleth
Web address-
Rose Eveleth . 2011. The elephant in the room: How contraception could save future elephants from culling . [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-elephant-in-the-room/. [Accessed 05 February 16].
Summary of evidence-
In the 1900’s poaching threatened to wipe out the elephant population in South Africa. This made conservationists worried, so they relocated and established reserves for elephants but by doing so they increased the elephant population too much. Now scientists have come to the conclusion, that in order to control this rapid increase in elephants they will have to use contraception
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2012. Will elephant contraception work in South Africa?. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-19990483. [Accessed 05 February 16].

Summary of evidence-
Elephant over population has a huge effect on the environment. The average elephant eats around 270kgs a day and they are very destructive while feeding. Many African countries are suffering from poaching but South Africa is suffering from elephant over population. The countries elephant population is estimated to be about 20 000 elephants.

Wildlife experts have put a majority of female elephants under a contraception method called Immunocontraception females are darted with the vaccine and a pink dye is stained on their skin, this dye makes it easier to identify the elephants that are under contraception. The results have been encouraging, as the number of elephant calves has halved. In 1994 the South African government haltered the killing of elephants and by 2008 the number of elephants in the Kruger National Park doubled.

Immunocontraception is a non-hormonal form of birth control. The organization argues that this form of contraception is cost effective at R1200 per elephant. Other organizations argue that it is not the right approach and it is not feasible in large scale parks such a The Kruger National
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I did not find this article satisfying and not very valuable because it contained too much information and the information was not very useful. Some of the information given will help me answer my question. This source has various limitations, as it is there is no evidence of the author is and a number of scientists have produced evidence. This means the article can contain information that is not right and the scientists have put their own opinion and information in which can make it biased.

Source D-
What is the most effective population control on elephants?
By- Merelize V.D Merwe
Web address-
Merelize V.D Merwe . 2015. Facebook Merelize huntress in South Africa . [ONLINE] Available at: https://www.facebook.com/HuntressMerelize/posts/860203734063376:0. [Accessed 05 February 16].

Summary of evidence-
There is a need for population control in the Kruger National Park. The number of elephants have increased drastically over the past years, 60-600 in 1918 and in 2010 it was 11 672, the population is increasing at a rate of 7% a year.

Wildlife conservationists have brought in a contraception method rather than culling. Immunocontraception is being used. It is not the same as human contraception as it does not rely on sex hormones. It contains proteins used from a female pigs egg or

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