Elements Of Gothic Literature

1861 Words 8 Pages
Horror stories are becoming increasingly popular in today’s era. The inquisitiveness of nature, behavior, and mysterious happenings in this specific genre have sparked interest in the unknown. When literary trends escaped the Age of Reason, literature was brought back to its traditional times when mysteries were fascinating. The most attainable model of creative narrative developed from the Middle Ages. The Middle Ages consisted of periods of crime, barbarism, works of witches, scientific innovation, and bold architecture to accompany specific needs. Medievalism extended its characteristics to the late 1700s, in which Gothic literature came about. The term “gothic” originally pertained to the Goths, who were members of a Germanic tribe that …show more content…
The elements that pervade in gothic literature range from piety, chivalry, mystery, medieval magic, terror, and illusion. These conventions thrived through the romantic era and continue to accompany fiction and film today. The importance of plotting, tone, and characterization in gothic writings are why this specific genre has become profound. Unlike the neoclassics, gothic writers give full rein to intuition, exuberance, variety, improbability, rough behaviors, and morbid fantasies. The early gothic masters embellish their work with the supernatural, mystery, and obscure settings. Contributions to the terror and figments of imagination often included collections of sinister paraphernalia, hidden passageways, sliding panels, and trap doors. It is evident that gothic conventions continue to evolve and have an immense impact on today’s cinematic work …show more content…
The creator of the first gothic setting was Horace Walpole, with his work, The Castle of Otranto. Walpole set his novel in a medieval building equipped with rusted hinges, a trapdoor, a walking portrait, and lamps that flicker during intense moments (Snodgrass). The Castle of Otranto proved to be so influential, that the conventions it initiated appealed to authors and people in the twenty-first century (Kowalczyk). Ann Radcliffe, the fount of gothic romanticism, exemplified gothic setting in her classic novel, The Mysteries of Udolpho. Later, gothic fiction expanded the significance of setting with Emily Bronte’s, Wuthering Heights. Shifts in the setting offer readers presumption about the nature of innocence and evil

Related Documents