Elements Of Arthur Miller's Driving Forces Of The Crucible

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Driving Forces of the Crucible Arthur Miller is recognized as one of America’s leading dramatists of the twentieth century. The most significant of Miller’s works were published in a ten-year period between 1947 and 1956. Some of these plays include All My Sons (1947), The Crucible (1952), and A View from the Bridge (1956). One of Miller’s most renowned works is The Crucible, a historical drama based on the witchcraft trials of 1692 in Salem, Massachusetts. A wave of fear and hysteria plagues the village when Reverend Parris discovers a number of girls dancing in the forest of Salem. According to the Puritan theocracy, dancing is a sinful act; therefore, Parris interprets the frolicking as witchcraft. The Crucible mirrors the uproar caused …show more content…
Jealously can best be seen in the character of Abigail Williams. Abigail is jealous of Elizabeth Proctor, John Proctor’s wife, because she believes that John Proctor still has feelings for her after their affair. “I have a sense for heat, John, and yours has drawn me to my window, and I have seen you looking up, burning in your loneliness,” Abigail asserts confidently to John Proctor. This quote suggests that Abigail still believes that John has feelings for her even after he denies his affection. In an attempt to destroy Elizabeth Proctor, Abigail accuses Elizabeth of witchcraft with the hope that she will be tried and hung by the court. According to John H. Ferres, “A personal guilt she will not accept is the real motive behind Abigail’s irresponsible attempts to destroy Elizabeth by exploiting the Puritan phobia of witchcraft.” Edward Murray, editor and interpreter of The Crucible, also states, “Abigail wants John.” Abigail’s longing for John is apparent throughout the play. Abigail’s attempt to destroy Elizabeth Proctor clearly shows her envious …show more content…
Mary Warren, a seventeen-year-old girl that has replaced Abigail Williams as the Proctor’s servant, best portrays how hysteria grips the town of Salem. Mary Warren is believed to have conjured the devil and is linked to the scene in the woods where Reverend Parris first discovered signs of witchcraft. In the court scene of Act III, Mary claims to have been tempted by the devil. “He come at me by night and every day to sign, to sign, to—,” Mary yells hysterically in the court seen. This line proves that she has been tempted by the devil and has succumbed to his will. In addition, she admits to witchcraft and accuses John Proctor of being the messenger of the devil. The action of admitting to witchcraft redeems her and implicates John Proctor. According to Henry Popkin, an academic philosopher who specialized philosophy and anti-dogmatism, “This decision has disastrous results, for Mary Warren, facing serious punishment as a turncoat and a possible witch, must defend herself by making a new charge—against the man who got her into this mess, John Proctor.” Mary Warren’s hysteria causes mass confusion and separation in the court and throughout

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