Electoral College Federalism

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Inventors, states, and electors all have one thing in common and that is their rights. Whether they 're the rights to an invention or the inalienable rights of a human, they are all in place to protect the rightsholder. Protecting rights is a major idea that the founding fathers had in mind when declaring their independence. The electoral college is a rarely understood establishment, that provides rights to all voters in America, while protecting the states as well. Due to a low informed population, conflict has arisen between whether or not it still remains necessary after so many years. The United States must keep the electoral college as it is a valuable establishment that restricts the power of the national government and populated regions, …show more content…
However, there is an idea penetrating people 's minds that could hinder this American ideal, and this idea is called The National Popular Vote Interstate Compact. Explained by Dotinga, the main goal of the plan is, “A bunch of states team up and give all their electoral college votes to the nationwide popular-vote winner, regardless of who won the most votes in their state.” (Dotinga) This is a direct attack not only against the electoral college but against federalism. The electoral college takes power away from the federal government and gives it to the states. It does this by the number of electors that each state has, which in return gives every state a say. This is best said by Uhlmann in the quotation, “we could dispense with most of the distinctive features of the Constitution—not only electoral votes, but also federalism.” (Uhlmann) The electors that are commonly attacked are actually there to keep intact the federalism that the U.S. stands for. Abolishing the electoral college or even merely converting to NPV would kill the federalism that America stands for and in doing so would alter the separation of powers between state and national government. Ultimately, the electoral college was developed for a number of reasons that are very rarely taught to the average citizen and often times this leads to a construed …show more content…
Likewise, Al Gore, popular vote winner in 2000 mentioned that “We’ve got to get back to harvesting the wisdom of crowds in the United States. We’ve got to get back to the kind of conversation of democracy that allows good ideas to rise to the surface.” (Rhodan) Ultimately, he believes that getting rid of the electoral college would encourage pure democracy and allow the U.S. to flourish. Al Gore hasn’t always felt this way, but has recently changed his outlook believing the negatives have began to outweigh the positives. His campaign chairman on the other hand, feels the electoral college is still necessary stating “the electoral college has generally served the republic well.” (Daley) Daley realizes that even though the electoral college does not always elect the popular vote nominee, it keeps the gap between large and small states equal. Along with that, when the constitution was being written the founding fathers knew that a pure democracy would not work from noting how the French freely elected a dictator. Goodman states, “Each vote granted Napoleon more power until he became an absolute emperor over the French people. The French democratically and freely voted away their own liberty.” (Goodman) Finally, the U.S. declared its independence because they were a minority group who had no representation within the government. The electoral college stands to

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