George Washington Election Process

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The research provided is about George Washington and his presidency. It provides a depth and knowledge of the kinds of things George Washington accomplished for the United States government. This paper focuses on the election process of Washington, the United States first president, how the election process is similar to what we have today. Another main idea in the essay was Washington’s involvement of the Constitution, he had many ideas that were used in the making of the Bill of Rights. Washington also was considered the leader of the Constitutional Convention, which was a convention to talk and form the Constitution. Also, the Anti-Federalists had challenged the making of the Constitution claiming it was not protecting individual rights, …show more content…
The Founding Fathers revised the Articles of Confederation and established a new government during the long months during the Convention. Almost two years after, and between the time George Washington was elected president of the United States and inaugurated, the Constitutional Convention was held, the new Constitution became the law of the land on March 4th, 1789. It was very likely that Washington had the most authority and contribution to the United States Constitution. George Washington’s and the formation of the Constitution was very significant because he played the central role, especially in the year of 1787. (Constitutional Convention. n.d.) There were opponents in the making of the Constitution. The two sides were the Federalists, which supported the Constitution and the Anti-Federalists, who opposed and were against the Constitution. The Anti-Federalists had complaints about the Constitution not protecting individual rights and threatened liberties. Their efforts to stop the Constitution from becoming the law of the land had failed, but their efforts were responsible for creating the Bill of Rights and the individual rights mentioned in the amendments. (The great debate. …show more content…
The election process of the president was constructed, as well as, the two term in office tradition was established, which was to help not corrupt the presidential process, for example, a formation of monarchy, where a king or queen rule the country. Washington was a big part of the Constitution and its progression and ratification. Lastly, Washington used his executive power to veto bills, constructed other bills, and created agreements to build trust with other nations, which creating more peace for the United States to grow and expand in size and development. Washington’s involvement in government and his presidency was a learning process, but his knowledge and predictions strengthened the United States, making it stand out and differ from other countries. The United States and their government earned their success starting with a few men, including George

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