Eleanor Roosevelt's Role Of Women In American Politics

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Eleanor Roosevelt, better known as the person who change the role of the first lady through her active participation in American politics, earning with it the respect, admiration and acceptance in society. Eleanor, had more participation in politics than other first ladies in the past, she was not ready to stay in the background and dedicate herself just to her family; for her it was important to show the world that the first lady was an important part of politics. The woman in that time of change was being accepted and her help was crucial for the total acceptance of women in society. Eleanor was ready to spoke out for human rights and the problems of women and children. To do this, she had her own column in a newspaper, "My Day." Here she …show more content…
The prayer was the subject of the debate between the governors and the Supreme Court, and it was supported by the state government. It was assumed that prayer would be used in schools under the direction of the state. However, the Supreme Court declared the law unconstitutional because, according to the constitution, no individual can be forced by the government to adhere to a certain religion or to conform to a certain religious procedure. Eleanor agreed with the Supreme Court and affirmed the words of her husband, she explained that the constitution does not specify the religion of a person; it gives the responsibility and the right to be religious in their own way. The decision was strongly criticized by many conservative’s minds, thinking that they were being take away from god and that the government was communism who wanted to impose their rules. But the emotional reaction to a Supreme Court decision was already expected and Eleonor ended the column saying that Real religion is displayed in the way you live in your day-by-day activities at home, in communities, families and …show more content…
Knowing that Eleonor was an intelligent woman, Franking Roosevelt gave her the authority to express her concerns, because there are things that a president cannot do or say, but the first lady can. Eleonor, as a woman, could express her opinion and express her discomfort with social injustice, as a mother, she knew what millions of mothers went through when they had husbands or sons in war. she put herself on the side of the people, she expressed things in a straightforward way, so they could identify with her. Religion was a critical issue, because when we talk about religion many emotions are affected, but the way to approach the situation was impeccable, so well approached that today it is still preserved. Eleonor was a key player in the Roosevelt presidency, of course that was not all for her, because her career continued; before her, the wives of the presidents did not use to speak in public activities; she changed the role not only of the first lady but also of the woman, spoke out on sensitive issues and had an active role in public policy, Eleanor was harshly criticized by some. However, it was praised by others, and today, it is considered a leader of civil rights and women. She fought against unfair situations, rather than by reporting, complaint and history of problems, choose to propose solutions and insist that change, as well as urgent and

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