Eleanor Roosevelt: Changing The Name Of Leadership

Improved Essays
Changing The Name of Leadership
“A good leader inspires people to have confidence in the leader, a great leader inspires people to have confidence in themselves.” Eleanor Roosevelt once said. Growing up in a harsh life full of loss at only the age of 10, both her mother and father had died. Eleanor had nothing. What really opened her eyes to the real world, was when she was sent to England to go to an all girl’s school. The headmistress at the school, Mademoiselle Marie Souvestre, took Eleanor in, and had inspired her with education and the art of thinking. When Eleanor was eligible to return back to her hometown in New York, she did quickly. From then on, she became closely engaged with social services, and joined the Junior League, an organization for women that help volunteer to improve communities through leadership. She then began teaching at the Rivington Street Settlement House. October 11, 1884 was the day a true leader was born into America. Starting off with just joining the Junior League Organization, to becoming the First Lady, to speaking freely about human rights, and being appointed to the Commision on the Status of Women, Eleanor Roosevelt proved herself to be an inspiring leader.
Eleanor Roosevelt accomplished many important things during her life. Rising up
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She believed that women had the right to vote. She volunteered at the International Congress of Working Women in Washington. Eleanor’s feelings towards women 's labor issues grew stronger and more appealing. While travelling around with her husband, she became friends with Louis Howe. They had a strong friendship together, and he supported her as she joined the League of Women Voters. This league was to promote women’s right to vote. Eventually she became president of the league. Another club that she joined was the bi-partisan Women’s City Club. This club was formed to inform women about the political press and the social

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