Egan Vs Society

944 Words 4 Pages
While Tiptree presents a society that is fearful about information overload in the physical world, Egan depicts a direct and constant fear of losing parts of the mind. For society in Tiptree’s story, “Their nightmares are about hemorrhages of information” (Tiptree, 45). However, for P. Burke, the fear is of having to stay in a body that society will not accept. In Egan’s story, he describes the character’s fear of mind control by the jewel, but explains some major changes in the body as statements of fact rather than aspects that the characters are cautious about. The narrator explains how “the nervous system is rewired; the reins of the body are handed over to the jewel...The brain is removed, discarded, and replaced” (Egan, 159). Throughout …show more content…
The narrator in Egan’s story explains how he “drifted apart from my friends. I stopped searching for a lover. I took to working at home” (Egan, 164). P. Burke, on the other hand, is in love with Paul, whom she meets as Delphi in cyberspace, but he is horrified when he sees her real body. Perhaps Tiptree chose not to give P. Burke the opportunity to tell her own story in order to fully capture her helplessness as a result of society’s shallow judgements. In contrast, the narrator of Egan’s story becomes a victim to the “fear of switching” that was “suffocating” (Egan 164). During his brief time in higher education, the narrator discusses the “Cartesian dualism” in an essay, to which his professor responds by saying his argument is “IRRELEVANT” (Egan, 161). In this case, the professor’s response represents that of society as well, as the narrator seems to be in a minority group of people holding anxieties about how the jewel could change them forever, while the majority of people eventually switch, despite their fears. However, the narrator also worries excessively over the implications of the mind or personality being harmed, when he should have paid an equal amount of attention to how his body would never be the same …show more content…
P. Burke is forgotten in the end, as it is revealed that “there’s a different chick in Chile, because while Delphi’s new operator is competent, you don’t get two P. Burke’s in a row-for which GTX is duly grateful” (Tiptree, 78). Not only is P. Burke mostly forgotten, but she is also easily, and gratefully, replaced. As cyberspace in this world allows ads, which are illegal in the real world, the space might seem like a type of freedom, but instead it is a place where people are often manipulated, as shown through P. Burke’s mind being used to create

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