Effects Of The Sugar Revolution

Decent Essays
The Caribbean is a large region consisting of the Caribbean Sea the islands within and surrounding coasts. The massive range of space carries twenty-eight islands nations and over seven thousand individual islands. This tropical place is a well-known, vastly diverse area representing the harsh effects of slavery, racism, colonialism and plantation. The overall process of the eliminating slavery was unfortunately obstructed by the increase demand of growing the Caribbean industries. The sugar industry, agricultural industry and the mining industry were three of the main industries that held back the improvement of slavery. The revolution had fundamental implications for all aspects of the enconomy, society and government. When the slave trade …show more content…
For example Barbados had over 150 square mines of land waiting to be made into plantations. The Kings as well as Royal family had a demand for sugar cane, which made them invested into the slave trade. Barbados used this tactic to employ over 80 percent of the slave population in their country where almost 175 plantations were placed throughout the small island. They were “the purported home of sugar revolution, was denued of almost all its native vegetation as early as 1665”. (Higman, 106) Some of these plantations even ranged over 500 acres. At this time Brazil was another country that had a large demand for sugar plantations in which needed slave labor to fulfill their needs. Brazil found it hard to generate a large slave industry because there was an outbreak of small pox in the country, which largely affected the slave force. This led them to reaching out to the Caribbean where they employed many Caribbean’s for their labor work of the plantations. Today, Brazil is one of the largest growing plantations that still exist as now they export coffee as well as sugar at a fast growing rate. The fast pace and hard work that the slaves had to face unfortunately set back their life expectancy about sixteen years from the day they started working on the plantation. The sugar cane industry had “the heaviest …show more content…
They felt they were being treated unfairly as slaves. They were forced with spending long hours on their feet in the blazing sun and supervised constantly by overseers who were not afraid to use a whip. These plantations relied completely on the slave force concentrating on the profitability of a crop. Rebellions began because the slaves were fed up with the harsh conditions they were forced to work upon. It was in 1806 in Haiti where a peaceful rebellion was done where slave owners responded by offering improving working conditions or food and potential freedom. Even though the Haitian rebellion was successful many were not. For example The Baptist war started as peaceful protest ended in a ‘bloody uprising and a death of 600 slaves’. (Andrews, 2013) It was very unfortunate that this had to happen because all the slaves wished for was rates lowered and wage benefits such as crops from themselves and family. It made slavery seem less appealing. This is todays society would be completely acceptable to ask for however in this era it is a lot to ask for. Due to the first rebellion in the Barbados the code 1661 was created to provide legal protection. The code was set to give the slaves one set of clothing each-year however no standards based on the right to life were made. The Masters still in complete control of the slaves and could do whatever they wished to them, including whipping them. This was very

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    European Slave Trade Essay

    • 1645 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The goods that were brought across were then traded for enslaved Africans. Many slaves that traded had then bought a share that was in there slave ship. The slave trade had made many goods like sugar that became more priceless for the people that had lives in Britain. The European Slave Trade that was outside of Africa had quickly expanded. There were large numbers and high price of Africans and money.…

    • 1645 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Denmark was the first to abolish the slave trade, but it had little impact. After creating various clubs and signing petitions the society moved into action because they felt that slavery was horrible and the Middle passage was the most cruel part of the slave trade system. Internationalizing abolitionism was difficult , Portugal wanted money and also settled to only end the trade north of the equator ; more over Spain and the Netherlands signed treaties. Despite, the signed treaties and abolition of slave trading by Britain and other countries illegal trading continued. Many Africans were enslaved and transported to the sugar plantations.…

    • 842 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    After the Haitian revolution ended in 1804 many African slaves were legally and illegally imported to Cuba for work on the sugar plantations (Maya Pons 220). It is estimated that 77,189 African slaves were imported by Cuban planters between the years 1791 and 1803. This approximated to about 6,000 African slaves per year (Maya Pons 224). The roles of the African slaves included cultivating and cutting of the crops, pulling wagons, and processing the sugar cane with the machinery. A typical workday for the African slave lasted twenty hours during harvest and processing time and living conditions were cruel and unhygienic ("Spanish Rule, Sugar and Slaves").…

    • 1127 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Although African slaves had strong immunity to life-threatening disease like malaria and yellow fever, untold numbers of Africans died from severe fatigue. Nevertheless, the slavery still continued because the land owners forced breeding between slaves in order to increase the population of slaves. Slave breeding included coerced sexual relations between male and female slaves and sexual relations between the owner and slave. The land owners looked at the fertility of slave women as productivity of slave children. Under the Barbados code, the landowners were able to control and sole entire families of slaves.…

    • 797 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Throughout the years of the 1600 and 1700’s, Slavery affected many people either for the good or the bad. The debate regarding slavery being justified or unjustified has been an ongoing discussion. Those who believe slavery was justified believe this for mainly economic reasoning at the time. Savory flourished immensely for economic growth within the colonies. Slave labor was essential to the cultivation of tobacco, rice, indigo and sugar in the British West Indies and the southern and Chesapeake colonies.…

    • 1154 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Black Slavery Thesis

    • 1774 Words
    • 7 Pages

    !8th century was the climax of the migration of the Black Africans to Americans, with the figure estimated by the Historians to be around 9 million slaves (Wilma 24). The migration incidence was indeed a blow to African continent since their elegant people had disappeared foreign nations to take part in slavery as well as serve the white people. In most cases, the slaves worked in large plantations that reared crops such as tobacco, rice and other cash crops that mostly benefited the whites. The slaves did not secure any pay at all, but received some food and shelter as their pay. It is also vial to note that most of the slaves lived in the Southern American and worked in the firms of the…

    • 1774 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Triangular Trade Essay

    • 1503 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Slavery existed prior to triangular trade, however it was localized into various regions of the world, with many of a nation’s slaves being enemy soldiers defeated in battle. By no means is this humane, however these people are more like prisoners than slaves. Even indentured servantry supersedes pure slavery, as the indentured servants have freedom waiting on the horizon should they meet their service requirement as payment for their transport to the New World. Yet, with the “discovery” of the Americas, and their knack for allowing cash crops to blossom, European nations seized the opportunity to make a fortune on tobacco, cotton, and sugar plantations, and in the process, threw all care for their workers out the window. According to outside and objective observer, Giuseppe Andreoni, “The most dangerous place on the [Brazilian sugar] plantation is the sugar mill…” (Doc.…

    • 1503 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    One of the very first successful uprisings was the Bussa rebellion which occurred in 1816 in Barbados. The uprising was unexpected and sudden. The element of surprise is what gained the slaves their freedom, as well as, the tactful planning of their leader Bussa and other men and women on several plantations. The Africans proved to their European oppressors that they were unhappy being dehumanized and sold as property for their profit. The Africans proved that they were willing to die in order to be free of European imperialist…

    • 1811 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The affects were drastically leading to war, cultural suffering, separation, and a population decrease. The trading of slaves elevated the number of wars that occurred in West Africa, due to the lack of European traders capturing their own slaves. As a result, many people from Africa felt obligated to transfer over to the Americas, where they will make an enormous influence economically. As for the culture of Africa, many families were divided and traded to separate countries. Africa’s population was nearly 18 percent around 1600, but significantly dropped to six percent in the 1900s.…

    • 814 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Colonies Economic System

    • 1013 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The conditions of traveling on these disgusting and sickening slave ships had almost been worst than the treatment that Africans endured upon arrival of America. If the slaves survived the horrifying journey, they would soon be sold to white landowners and moved to their new homes. Although Africans had been scattered throughout the three regions, they had made up the majority of the labor force in the Southern Colonies. While it was unsure at first of the social status of African slaves within America, the roles between blacks and whites became distinct in the early eighteenth century. Black workers were obliged to work permanently for their masters, unlike the white servants who were freed after a fixed amount of time.…

    • 1013 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays