How Did Jim Crow Laws Affect African Americans In The Early 1900s

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The United States in the early 1900’s was characterized by racism towards African Americans and their plea for equality. Despite the Civil War and 13th Amendment ridding the U.S. of slavery, society still favored whites and many African Americans were discriminated against because racism was still a monumental issue. Many court cases were created regarding African American equality, and not many ended by them gaining it. The Jim Crow Laws impacted the government by providing it the power to enforce segregation and disallowed African Americans to have facilities equivalent to those of whites. Not only did the laws impact the lifestyle of African Americans, but it also assisted contributed to the spread of racism and violence towards African Americans.
Before the Jim Crow Laws came the Black Codes. These Codes were laws passed by southern states in 1865 and 1866, after the Civil War. They had the intent and effect of restraining African Americans’ freedom, and compelled them to work in a labor economy based on low wages or debt. They also proved that there was still widespread racism after the Civil War, and constructed a base for the Jim Crow Laws. The Jim Crow Laws were state and local laws enforcing racial
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Not only was it harder to find a job as a non-white, but black and white workers could not work in the same facilities. Many industries would not hire blacks because of the laws that unions passed to exclude them. Along with work, many streets were segregated and so whites and blacks could not live on the same street. In Texas, there were six towns in which people of African American descent were not allowed to live. Different facilities were built for doors, ticket windows, water fountains, and even benches. They also made separate prisons, hospitals, schools, and orphanages. In college, black and white fraternity members were not allowed to call each other

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