The Fall Of Singapore's Defeat Of The British Empire

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The fall of Singapore is regarded as one of the greatest military defeats in the history of British Empire. The official surrender of Singapore occurred on the 15th of February 1942. This defeat clearly illustrated Japan’s military ferocity and the probable threat of invasion of Australia. Singapore was of great strategic importance to the British Empire due to its location. It was the main line of communication between the far-east and Europe. An army who controlled Singapore essentially controlled the straits of Malacca. It was a key defence strategy. Singapore “was considered a vital part of the British Empire and supposedly impregnable as a fortress. The British saw it as the "Gibraltar in the Far East".” There is more than a single reason …show more content…
Australia realised that they did not have a first line of defence with Britain no longer able to protect Australia. The ‘Singapore Strategy’ was an agreement made between the government of Australia and Britain promising that a British fleet would be sent to Singapore as a main line of defence if an attack from the Japanese was imminent. It was accepted as the main defence in the Far East. The British Government promised to send the fleet within 70 days of a threat developing in the Far East. It was then extended to 90 days until eventually, following the fall of Singapore, no fleet was sent and the ‘Singapore Strategy’ became false hope for Australia. Eventually, Australia looked to America for support. Realising that the threat of invasion was probable, Australia’s desperation to have a solid line of defence to repel the Japanese was of number one importance. Since most Australian troops were deployed in Europe and Northern Africa, Australia lacked proper defence and could not rely on its self to provide a solid defence. Finally, Australia formed a partnership with America to try repel the rapidly growing might that was the Imperial Japanese army. Curtin announced “Without any inhibitions of any kind, I made it quite clear that Australia looks to America, free of any pangs as to our traditional links or kinship with the United …show more content…
It is arguable Britain failed to meet the standards agreed upon by the Australian and British government and could have easily been seen to abandon Australia. However, Britain certainly did not betray Australia because it could plausible to argue that it had no other real option. When circumstances change or are unforseen, in this case the rapid expansion of the Imperial Japanese army and the raging war in Europe, it can be reasonable for people and even nations to change their position or agreements. With that being said, it also understandable that Australia may have felt not just abandoned, but

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