Effects Of The Equal Rights Amendment

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The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) was first introduced in to congress in 1923, the amendment stated “Men and women shall have equal rights throughout the United States and every place subject to its jurisdiction.” [4]. The Equal Rights Amendment for those who desired the changes were focused on achieving political as well as economic equality, others sought racial equality [4]. Those who didn’t support the amendment were content on being old-fashioned and still cherished the old ideals that the men were suppose-to be in control of everything [4]. This movement when it should have brought women together as a unified force instead, broke certain groups apart due to issues with divided in tactics and goal setting [4]. In 1924 Alice Paul, a great …show more content…
Alice Paul and the NWP wrote the ERA it advance women’s equality but it sought to break away from other reform issues, while other groups chose to use the ERA to further enhance other reform movements [3]. Eastman argued that "the feminist program must not become part of . . . a general reform program." This was due to there is many aspects of reform that need to be changed for women so the groups shouldn’t just focus on one reform but multiple to further improve the life of women [3]. Eastman argued that women from all classes understand the hardships of being a women, so why are we not unifying to change? She brought this up because many groups were trying to gain one thing from the ERA whether it be political status for women, or rights for the different races [4]. Addie Hunton the leader of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored people (NAACP), stated “five million women in the United States cannot be denied their without all the women of the United States feeling the effect of that denial.”[4]. Hunton further explained that women will not be free until every women of every race and age are free [4]. The groups not banding together increased the amount of problems and difficulties arose due to the reform groups not coming together …show more content…
Carol Rehfisch who was a secretary for the Womens Party, witnessed a women talk to Paul. The women stated the she had “no interest and no sympathy with the ER cause, but that she conceived it to be Alice Paul’s mission to espouse at once the cause of Universal Peace.” [1]. Men were the most talkative about the ERA and told Alice Paul “Equal Rights campaign was all a delusion and a snare, and that women would never obtain equality until the present economic system was swept away.” [1]. The same man went on “women had already nothing but privileges.” And that he believed that equal rights had been created by the Woman’s Party and that it needed to be stopped before it was achieved [1]. Many women believed that females as well as males should be trained to support themselves [3]. Not because women have been forced to do it for centuries but because it further develops a self-importance [3]. But, it is also beneficial that males and females learn how to properly take care of a home incase someday a mother might pass and the father resumes responsible for the home or the other way around [3]. It is universally beneficial to learn multiple tasks so one becomes self-efficient in the future. Not all men and women believed in this however, in 1924 those who opposed the ERA, believed the women were weaker than men physically and that “law should fix shorter hours for women in

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