Cold War: The Arms Race

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The arms race. A competition for supremacy in nuclear warfare that occurred before and during the Cold War. In this time, both the US and the Soviet Union were competing for supremacy. When the power of the nuclear weapon was discovered, both the United States and the Soviet Union believed that the more nuclear weapons they had, the more powerful they were. Thus the arms race began. Both of these countries aimed to create more and more nuclear weapons in order to have the upper hand which had major effects on relations. This arms race between the US and the Soviet Union and nuclear proliferation resulted in a more stable, but tense relationship.
Nuclear proliferation had started with the end of the Manhattan project, commonly known as the
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The Cuban Missile Crisis was an example of the effort towards the stabilization of relationships between the US and Soviet Union during the arms race. It focused mainly on the tensions of the nuclear warfare between the superpowers, the US and Soviet. From the start of the Manhattan project till the beginning of the installation of missiles in Cuba, the tensions between the US and Soviets were on the verge of war. During the Cold War, the US and Soviet Union were clashing in their views of government, Communism vs. Democracy.
After Fidel Castro gained power in Cuba, Cuba started to be economically and politically dependent on the Soviet Union. On October 14th, 1962, an American U-2 plane flew over Cuba and found Soviet SS-4 medium-ranged ballistic missile being assembled for launch. This was a huge threat to the US as there were missiles 90 miles away from Florida. The Soviets had seen Cuba as perfect choice because of the hostile relationship between the US and Cuba, as well as, government similarities between the Soviet Union and
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It was one of the main contributing factors to United States and Soviet Union relations. The Mutually Assured Destruction aspect of it made sure that both parties were kept in line at all times. It deterred each side from engaging in actual war. For instance, in the Cuban Missile Crisis, war was narrowly avoided. This is because of the fact that both countries had the power to annihilate each other instantly. If the Soviet Union launched missiles from Cuba, the United States would launch missiles from Turkey. Although this feared relationship avoid war and devastating conflict, it also resulted in tense relation between both countries. Though the arms race is over, there will always be bitter tensions between these two countries, especially when it comes to diplomacy. But if relations are looked at now compared to the past, it is shown to be much better, with much less tension. The arms race can be seen as a double edged sword. Although it prevented violence, it fostered animosity between the two

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