Effects Of The Agricultural Revolution

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The nineteenth century spanned from 1801 until 1900 in which the agricultural and industrial revolution took place. The industrial revolution that began in the early 1800s could not have occurred without the agricultural revolution occurring first. During the Agricultural revolution several inventions were created that reduced workers tedious methods of labor but produced more work for them during their long workdays. Producing textiles, canals, railways, the cotton gin, and the seeding drill, and more all helped to enhance productivity of human labor in the nineteenth century. Industrialization changed the way laborers lived, how they worked, the type of work they did, and many different conditions of daily life in America. Although technological …show more content…
Most factories were located in cities, such as New York and Philadelphia; so more people migrated to the North to look for jobs, which increased populations of the cities. The population in New York increased to “over 312,000 in 1840 and almost tripled in two decades and its manufacturing workforce reached over 25,000 strong which would more than triple in the next ten years”(Clark, et al. 341). Although people were looking for more jobs they still had meager pay wages as well as strenuous and dangerous working conditions. Wages were very low, for example, “an 1830 report noted needlewoman earning as little as $55 a year and having to pay $26 for rent alone”(Clark, et al. 341). Even though the labor was strenuous and the workplace was dangerous the employers did not mind paying the workers so little amounts of wages. Employers cut the worker’s wages, increased rent on the boardinghouses, and increased the amount of work they had to …show more content…
For example, Adam Smith a political economist viewed the division of labor as positive and a benefit to workers and employers. In contrast, Alexis de Tocqueville a French political thinker and historian viewed the division of labor as negative that made workers stagnant in their lives. Adam Smith had stated that there was a “great increase of the quantity of work which is owing to three different circumstances; first, to the increase of dexterity, secondly, to the savings of time, and lastly to the invention of a great number of machines”(Smith, P05). Smith believed that making a process the only employment of a workers’ life that it would increase the handiness of the worker. But Tocqueville believed that when a worker “is unceasingly and exclusively engaged in the fabrication of one thing, he ultimately does his work with singular dexterity; but at the same time he loses the general faculty of applying his mind to the direction of the work”(Tocqueville, P02). Tocqueville believed that the worker became weaker, narrow-minded, and more dependent as the division of labor continuously applied to workers’ lives. Adam Smith produced his views on the division of labor and decades later Alex de Tocqueville came about with a more opposing view to

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