Shark Finning Research Paper

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Declined in shark population breaks stability of The marine ecosystem
The shark, the predator that stands on top of the food chain. However, its number has declined since the 1970s due to human destruction, and it will affect the stability of the food chain (Dudley, and Cliff 243-255). For instance, in Aldo Leopold’s paper, A Sand County Almanac, he claims each specie’s importance in the food chain is the link to the other specie “The lines of dependency for food and other services are called food chains….Each species, including ourselves, is a link in many chains” (286). Along with shark’s substantial power as top predator in the ocean, it can help to keep each marine specie to balance in numbers (Fairclough 1); it behooves every humankind
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Shark finning had brought the fishing industry multimillion worth to attract numerous fishermen (NBC News). The reason that fishermen are so into shark finning is because the shark fin is profitable than most fish species, and it is unnecessary to carry the rest of shark’s body as it would consume the space on the vessel; they often throw the rest of its body into the ocean after removing the fins (Finning And The Fin Trade). The injured shark will die from suffocation, blood loss or become other species’ prey (Finning And The Fin Trade). Thus, as more the decreased amount in shark will break the food chain as its lower divisions to grow either in unstoppable pace or losing other species. To illustrate “A number of scientific studies demonstrate that depletion of sharks results in the loss of commercially important fish and shellfish species down the food chain, including key fisheries such as tuna, that maintain the health of coral reefs” (Shark’ Role In The Ocean). The shark helps to maintain the healthy marine habitat; most shark genus preys on those sick animals, in addition, some even scavenge the carcasses (Shark’ Role In The Ocean). That is to say, if the sharks are eliminated, the ocean would lose the great predator to keep the stability and health of the ecosystem; hence, saving the sharks from shark finning became remarkable as shark …show more content…
The nine states of United States: Hawaii, Oregon, Washington, California, Illinois, Maryland, Delaware, New York and recently Massachusetts (US States with Shark Fin Trade Regulations & Penalties). Although, some are not limited as exceptions as for use of educational, scientific, or other purposes (US States with Shark Fin Trade Regulations & Penalties). “Several cities in Canada and the UK have also adopted shark fin trade bans. Island nations including Palau, Fiji, the Cook Island and French Polynesia have also banned the trade of shark fin and placed prohibitions on shark killing” (US States with Shark Fin Trade Regulations & Penalties); this helps to regulate the shark population, and by this protecting law, I believe it could save millions of shark getting killed by shark finning. However, it isn’t enough to save more sharks; the oil spills was the issue discuss in earlier. There is a difficulty to have entire disintegration of oil spills be done in the Gulf of Mexico, because it is depending on varying

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