Sexuality Changes In Society

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Sexuality Changes in Society
The complication of human relationship is a prevalent discussion topic. Sexuality is diverse and personal, which leads to diversity in opinion. In the essay “Selections from Hard to Get: Twenty-Something Women and the Paradox of Sexual Freedom” Leslie bell contemplates about people’s cognitively conceives sexuality under the influence of sexual freedom. Leslie discusses different girls’ different opinion upon sexuality. Malcolm Gladwell, the author of “The Power of Context” states that people’s behavior and characters may change due to different situations and environments. Both two authors believe that thinking changes with what happen to that person and the choice they are making. Although people have their own
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The environment and what kind of people we connect to can influence us a lot. Our behavior and how we think can directly influence by our family, our friends, and where we are. We might feel forgivable if your family make your computer break down in a normal day. However, we might feel frenzied if your family ruins your computer when you have an assignment due few hours later or if that is a stranger break your computer but not anyone who you are intimate with. In the essay “The Power Of Context”, Malcolm Gladwell asserts that people’s characters are instable: “Character, then, isn’t what we think it is or, rather, what we want it to be. It isn’t a stable, easily identifiable set of closely related traits, and it only seems that way because of a glitch in the way our brains are organized. Character is more like a bundle of habits and tendencies and interests, loosely bound together and dependent, at certain times, on circumstance and context” (Malcolm Gladwell 160). Circumstance and environment trigger our different characters out of us. Our behaviors might change based on the environment and people’s opinion. That’s why it is so hard to define a person by only one things or one behavior. In the essay “Selections From Hard To Get”, Leslie Bell discusses about “the bad girl” Jayanthi, a twenty-nine-year-old Indian American who feels insecure and tries to make her parents feel that she are independent by having promiscuous relations with men. Jayanthi changes her behavior and the way she think about sexuality because the expectation her parents give and her growing-up environment. The outsides evoke her insiders that make her understanding of sexuality become so distinctive to be bad girl. “Particular for women from families with traditional ideas and teachings about sex( for example, some

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