Effects Of Overfishing

1727 Words 7 Pages
How can a species be saved if everyone is frightened of them? Ever since “Jaws” people have viewed Sharks as ferocious, dangerous man-eating monsters out to attack anyone who dares come into the water. The fact of the matter is that one-fourth of Shark populations is endangered of going extinct. After over 450 million years on this planet, Sharks have the possibility of extinction due to inadequate laws to protect them from actions such as finning, by catching, and habitat depletion. Sharks are an essential part of the ocean 's ecosystem and Without them, there will be huge repercussions. Sharks need our help, but there are not many people willing to help the creatures, ones with such a bad reputation, who are so misunderstood. Sharks are breathtaking …show more content…
Sharks bring balance to their ecosystem and are apex predators, meaning they are the predator at the head of the food chain where there is no other competition against them. Being an apex predator they are actually in charge of their food chain.Worldwide, overfishing has had profound effects on coastal ecosystems. Additionally, the approach that humans have taken to commercial fishing such as targeting of apex predators first and then fishing down the food chain has a negative effect on predators in most regional seas of the world. However, while researchers may know the effect that overfishing has had on specific species, how this may influence the rest of the ecosystem is relatively unpredictable. Consequently, When Shark populations fall it causes problems in their ecosystem. They maintain the order of their ecosystem by removing the sick and the weak, only the healthy are able to escape, this promotes survival of the fittest keeping the ecosystem at its finest. The loss of Sharks can also lead to the depletion of the habitat itself. Without Sharks the rise of large predatory fish that preys upon the herbivores, who consume algae in the ecosystem can occur. With fewer herbivores micro allergy is allowed to take over shifting the ecosystem, allow the shift to an algae dominant system. This shift in the ecosystem has an effect on local fisheries too, without a booming hub for fish and other sea animals to thrive the mark for …show more content…
As demand for some Shark species and Shark products such as fins have increased, concern has steadily grown regarding the status of many Sharks. Compared to other marine fish, Sharks are described by relatively slow growth, late sexual maturity, and a small number of young per brood. These biological factors leave many species of Sharks vulnerable to overfishing. ("A Closer Look at Shark Conservation") A major part of population decline is commercial Shark finning. Shark finning is a process of removing the fins from a live Shark and casting the animal back into the ocean, leaving them to die several days later (Fairclough, Caty. "Shark Finning: Sharks Turned Prey"). The rest of the Shark is then left because Shark meat is of low economic value and takes up too much space for the fisher to take them back. In addition, Shark meat also contains urea, which turns to ammonia once the Shark has died and contaminates other fish. This is done so the fins can be sold on the black market, fins are sold for about $650 per kilogram (about 2.2 lbs) so they are in high demand ("Shark Truth." Shark Fin Trade –.). The number of Shark fisheries has exploded, and there are signs that some Shark populations have declined dramatically. According to one estimate, by researchers at Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia, 100 million Sharks are now killed annually, on average, (Baum,

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