Effects Of Overcrowding In Schools

1689 Words 7 Pages
to function as a family in our society. For many families, a single parent home leaves the parent out of the house, working sometimes two jobs, for long periods of time in the day. This in turn translates into exhaustion of the adults that may maybe inhibit them from cognitively being able to help with or even inquire about their child’s progress in school academically or socially. This is especially the case in single parent homes. Although it seems likely that this issue directly correlates with income level, it in no way excuses the important part a parent or parents play in interactions academically or socially. It is especially important that parents, regardless of income level or education level, begin involvement with their kids’ education. …show more content…
Even in some colleges the problem persists, especially at the community college level. Ortiz stated in 2002, “Student enrollment at a national level has risen every year since 1984 and is expected to result in a 26% increase in the number of children in high school between 1988 and 2008 (pg.2).” While the demographics change constantly around the state, in particular the urban city schools, this puts a massive strain on teachers, buildings, and the quality of education each student receives individually. Typically, the first effect on students due to overcrowding is the more limited attention spent on students on an individual basis. Teachers become over burdened with trying to keep up with the curriculum schedules, while also trying not to leave those students who have a harder time understanding and learning what is being taught. The problem is compounded when teachers must move forward and on schedule with students being left behind. This problem begins to show later in the school year and ultimately each year after that in their test …show more content…
Children that grow up in poverty can be affected academically by a number of different issues. Children and families that live below the poverty line are 1.3 times as likely as those that don’t to develop learning disabilities (Brooks-Gunn, J., & Duncan, G. J. pg 61.(1997). Students that grow up in poverty are more likely to suffer from health issues like stunted growth, due to malnutrition, lead poising, and emotional and behavioral issues to say the least. It’s a fact; children bring many others issues to classrooms where teachers are put in incredible position to deal with. One of the biggest concerning the culture of children poverty is attendance. Because these families tend to live week by week, or even day by day, many kids may attend multiple schools throughout the school year. Children also identify class separation at an early age (Haycock, K. 2001). Children begin to recognize at an early age the differences in clothing and material possession which in turn can cause behavioral problems in the form of rebellion towards teachers and aggression towards kids that have those things that kids growing up in poverty don’t have. Poverty is a critical issue when it comes to kids development academically and socially. Often times, school intervention programs can help with malnutrition issues, but for the most part, these kids are left behind academically and

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