Effects Of Mineral Revolution In South Africa

Superior Essays
Mineral revolution refers to the development of industries and the economy in South Africa. In 1867, diamond was discovered in Kimberly followed by gold in 1886 which was discovered in Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. The discovery of minerals in South Africa brought along opportunities to society such as permanent jobs. Many people left their homes and came to Johannesburg for better jobs. This eventually led to urbanisation in the area. A society was created and people started to settle. This essay will analyse how the mineral revolution in South Africa affects the working class at Johannesburg in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.
Before the discovery of minerals people were living at the farms practising agriculture and looking
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They did the important job in the mines, but their effort was not recognised. They are earning was not enough to cover their financial needs. Miners ended up getting involved in gold smuggling and mugging. They had to find ways to sustain and provide for their families. In 1891 there were many reports about the gold theft and around 1894 this issue had already crossed the borders, miners were now selling stolen gold to the other countries . Gangsters were founded in the compounds, some of these were dominantly known for robbery and murder of a white miner for example the Ninevite and the Isitshozi …show more content…
Job opportunities had increased, these pushed people to migrate to the area. Thus when Johannesburg started to be a fully developed city. Men came and worked as miners and white men as supervisors or mine engineers. Racism in the mines was an issue that could not be avoided. Blacks had to work hard and risk their lives, diseases such as TB and Silicosis where the high in mines. They earned lower wages and for these reason they ended up getting involve in gold smuggling and mugging as to meet the needs of families. Women worked as barmaids, domestic workers, dress makers, laundry washers and prostitutes. There was also an easy spread of sexual transmitted diseases such as HIV/AIDS and Syphilitic because of the high rate of unprotected sex in the region. Violence also became another problem due to founded

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