Civil War Medical Technology Essay

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Civil War Medical Technology Civil war medical technology was not very good during the awful war of 1861-1865. With small shanty medical kits that were not adequate for the job that surgeons had ahead of them tools in the medical kit helped transmit diseases that were lethal. Weapons were being engineered to become more lethal and or more painful [also built to explode so it was harder for medical surgeons to save the soldier]. Transportation was also dominant problem that hurt both the Union and Confederacy. Things got progressively better as the civil war moved on. Medical technology was now being acknowledged and being worked on. The path was brighter then ever. Ambulances began to improve significantly, technology improved for the greater of man. If anything the Civil war was an advocate for medical technology to grow and develop. The kindling for new medical technology finally flared. From 1861-1865 technology was not very good. If anything the technology played a major advocate for disease on and off the battlefield. A stifling two-thirds ratio of soldiers, died from disease. Disease such as Typhoid were transmitted easily from unsanitary water and unsanitary field hospitals. Though those were vital and very crucial …show more content…
Towards the beginning of the war there was barely anything to transport the wounded. Lucky soldiers got a horse drawn ambulance to carry them away. It wasn’t until 1863 that field ambulances actually begun to come in a surplus. Field ambulances still took just as long [1-4 days after battle depending on weather and what not]. Hence pre- and during civil war ambulances weren’t very good. They were also very unsanitary and very slow. Usually they put two-four troops depending on the size. Only towards the end of the war were ambulances increased to have more sanitary conditions, and were beginning to come in

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