Japanese Internment In Canada

Improved Essays
World War II was a very difficult time for almost everyone living in either the Allies’ or Axis’ countries, especially for people of Japanese descent living in Canada. The Japanese-Canadian internment is a defining moment in Canada because it shows how poorly the Canadian governments, politicians, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), and labour unions treated Japanese-Canadians. They had no freedom; were incarcerated in internment, road, or prisoners-of-war camps; and lastly, were unequal compared to everyone else living in Canada, especially the white people. After Japan bombed the Pearl Harbour and attacked Hong Kong, enemy aliens, racial discrimination and deportation, and restriction were three main terms to describe Japanese-Canadians. …show more content…
Japanese people living in Canada suffered from racism ever since Manzo Nagano, the first Japanese to immigrant from Japan to Canada, came to New Westminster, British Columbia in 1877. During the next four decades, British Columbia politicians, along with Cooperative Commonwealth Federation (CCF), used racism against Japanese-Canadians to win elections. An anti-Asian sentiment in British Columbia had been around for seventy years before World War II and they did their best to force issei (first generation or immigrants) to leave Canada. Many left, but those who decided to stay and move to other provinces, were not allowed to return to British Columbia until 1949. This issue was taken up in court in 1946 and the decision that was made caused an uprising from both the Japanese and white community. It was a commonly held belief that Japanese work ethic might overthrow British Columbia, so the Canadian Pacific Railway discharged all Japanese employees. Laws prevented Japanese-Canadians from working in mines and prohibited them from working on any project funded by British Columbia. Japanese people got paid less than white labour unions because they accused the Japanese of stealing jobs, and employers raising higher standards for white unions. A white mob rampaged through Japanese areas in Vancouver to protest against the presence of Japanese workers. Because of the negative …show more content…
In 1895, the provincial government of British Columbia denied voting rights to citizens of Asiatic origin, including Japanese. After World War I, issei veterans became the only Japanese-Canadians receiving the right to vote. In 1936, the Japanese Canadian Citizens League gained the provincial vote, but sought to gain the federal instead. The CCF British Columbia members of Parliament persuaded the Liberal-dominated Committee to deny the franchise. The last control on Japanese was not lifted until 1949, when Japanese were finally allowed to vote. After Japan bombed Pearl Harbor and attacked Hong Kong, killing over one thousand Canadian soldiers, Canada confiscated Japanese people’s property and belongings. Japanese-Canadians were ordered to turn over their property and belongings to the Custodian of Enemy Alien Property as “protective custody” and most people never saw it again. The property and belongings were auctioned off for a fraction of its worth and some were used to pay for housing in camps. Two days later, the government gave the remaining Japanese twenty-four hours to pack a few belongings and move inland. The RCMP arrested Japanese operatives and impounded, indefinitely at the nearest port, one thousand and two hundred fishing boats owned by the Japanese. The issei migrated to the Fraser Valley and along the Pacific coastline, whereas others chose to settle in

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    In order to do so, they devised many strategies to attain this goal. Japanese Canadians have faced discrimination by the Canadian Federal government since the first person of Japanese origin, Manzo Nagano stepped foot on Canadian soil in 1877. The first action made by the Federal government to further oppress those of Japanese origin was to limit immigration by introducing the Head Tax in 1885. This tax originally cost Japanese immigrants fifty dollars per person to enter Canada as opposed to the ten dollar fee paid by the ‘desirable’ Northern Europeans. However, over time the price eventually increased to 500 dollars in 1903 (MTCSALC, 2011, p.1).…

    • 1831 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The Pearl Harbor attack will forever be viewed as the dark ages for the U.S. Laws were executed to stop Japanese immigration. Japanese Americans faced so much discrimination. About 120,000 Japanese Americans were relocated in internment camps, were they faced harsh times. Japanese Americans were not allowed to enlist in the military for being “the enemy raise” but later were able serve in the military. About 33,000 Japanese Americans served in the military, they joined about 4,500 troops in the 442nd Regimen.…

    • 1186 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This led to the forced internment of more than120,000 people of Japanese heritage on the West Coast. Often, entire families were placed in barbed-wire camps. Very few of non-Japanese descent were willing to defend these innocent people. On the contrary, the large majority of Americans supported locking up Japanese-American citizens. Those that were imprisoned were humiliated, treated as criminals and traitors, and had lost jobs and property.…

    • 1518 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Between 1942 and 1945, thousands of Japanese Americans, regardless of United States citizenship status, received orders to evacuate their homes and businesses. Sparked by rising fear and anxiety of the American people after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, a United States Naval base in Hawaii, the U.S. government relocated Japanese Americans to remote areas on the West Coast and in the south, isolating them in internment or relocation camps. With no actual evidence supporting the creation of internment camps, the U.S. forced Japanese Americans into camps because of Japanese involvement in Pearl Harbor leading to a rise in anti-Japanese paranoia sparked by economic success of Japanese-Americans, fear and prejudice erupting within the United States…

    • 1973 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Many Japanese were also barred from traveling to certain locations because they were guarded off by the military (Caylor 2). The same idea as what was happening to Jewish people in Germany under the Nazi regime. Japanese were forced into certain areas, like pogroms and were forced to stay in these areas, which restricted Japanese’s ability to live a normal life. Many politicians wanted “No Japanese- except in internment camps” showing how prevalent racism towards Japanese was present in the United States government and these people being elected shows the racism of the people of the United States towards Japanese (Caylor 2). Such a large number of Japanese were excluded or moved, mostly in the west coast of the United States, that it had many consequences to the Japanese that were forced to move and also the people who were living in the areas where many Japanese were forced to internment camps or were excluded (Caylor 7).…

    • 1117 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Japanese Canadians lived in British Columbia before the start of WW II and three quarters of them were born in Canada. In 1941, Japanese Canadians were forced to register with the government, thus declaring them as enemy aliens. After the bombing of Pearl Harbour and attack of Hong Kong, the Canadian government confiscated their property, deprived them of rights and revoked their citizenship. Despite the RCMP and the Canadian Army and Navy stating there were no evidence of military threat and that Japanese Canadians did not pose a threat to national security, they were interned in camps across the country. Many viewed this as an opportunity to eliminate the Japanese as economic competition, revealing that discrimination was common in Canada.…

    • 302 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Japanese American Racism

    • 977 Words
    • 4 Pages

    After training, he went to fight in the Philippines. After that he went to Tokyo. According to this interview, the concentration camp weren’t live or death situation. 120,000 Japanese Americans were sent to concentration camps because the president is afraid of spies from Japan. Although it wasn’t live or die situation, it was still horrible.…

    • 977 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    The Effects Of The Chinese Exclusion Act

    • 1446 Words
    • 6 Pages
    • 8 Works Cited

    Specifically, the newly industrialized Japanese jumped at the chance. So instead of Chinese workers taking the jobs of iterant Californians, the Japanese were doing it instead. They came in such great numbers that the California legislature could not create an act quickly enough. [5] Because of this, quiet bitterness began to form in the place of public racism. While the Japanese and other eastern Asians were barred from entering the country in 1924, forty-two years of intense, bitter dislike for the Japanese did nothing but fan the flames of American Nativist policies.…

    • 1446 Words
    • 6 Pages
    • 8 Works Cited
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Immediately after the attack, anyone suspected to have ties to Japan was arrested and taken to assembly and relocation centers. They were given a short notice that forced them to abandon their businesses and homes and move to relocation camps that were in remote areas. Two-thirds of the Japanese interned were American citizens from West Coast. In 1942 February General John DeWitt, the commander of the West Coast military ordered the relocation of all the Japanese-Americans from the West Coast on racial grounds to internment camps. Japanese race was seen as a threat to the security of US.…

    • 1710 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    What caused this was the attack on Pearl Harbor which took place in 1941 where the Japanese bombed the base in Hawaii. After this attack America grew suspicious of undercover unwanted aliens of the japanese culture so they locked up according to Japanese-American Internment. (n.d.)Retrieved January 29, 2018, from http://www.ushistory.org/us/51e.asp “Over 127,000 united states citizens” because they were of japanese ancestry. Many homes were sold, and many families were separated because some of the fathers were considered people spies for the Japanese. This process of relocation caused a lot of families to lose a lot of money.…

    • 1512 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays