Effects Of Japanese Internment Camps

Superior Essays
Japanese-American internment camps had devastating effects in the United States by raising issues among the internees on how to reconcile their cultural identities amidst growing resentment and discrimination. .2 The camps were established by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt in Executive Order 9066 on February 19, 1942 and stated that fall people with Japanese ancestry living in the Pacific Coast region should be placed in internment camps.1 President Roosevelt justified the camps as a necessary effort to ensure “the successful prosecution of the war [it] requires every possible protection against espionage and sabotage to national defense utilities.” The Japanese internment camps were a result of years of tension and discrimination …show more content…
In the newspapers established at each internment camp, “rarely did the term ‘Japanese-American appear; instead internees were referred to as ‘colonists’...All camp papers referred to U.S governmental authorities, or non-internees, as the ‘Caucasians.”9 The internees refused to make a distinction between themselves and other Americans,. Despite their rights as American citizens being stripped away and they being confined within barbed wire, internees still truly believed they were Americans. The internees stressed their American identity to try to get rid of the idea that they were different from their American counterparts. They did not want conform to the belief that Japanese Americans would be against America in the war …show more content…
Not only did they create physical and economic scars on the internees, but they also affected their cultural identity . Internees struggled to define their cultural identity. nyMany internees were tied to America legally, but the government had taken away their rights and treated them horribly. Internees at first decided to suppress their Japanese cultural identity, choosing to express their American identity more. However, they later grew resentful and questioned authority, eventually coming to embrace their Japanese ancestry. By the end of the internment period, internees formed a new mixed identity, although many still doubted the American ideals they had once

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