How Does Globalization Affect Germany

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Globalization Impacts due to Immigration in Germany Since the 1980’s Germany has had the largest influx of immigrants compared to any other country in the world. The largest immigrant group in Germany is that of Muslim refugees (especially from Turkey). Most of them had fled from countries currently at war or ruled by tyrannical governments. This massive rise of immigrants has sparked a large anti-immigration movement from permanent residents in recent years. This is mostly due to cultural differences, social interaction, and the possibility of economic downfall. The radical differences between cultures have been a root cause of many conflicts throughout human history. With the hundreds of thousands of immigrants pouring into Germany every …show more content…
Some of the stereotypes of Turkish immigrants given by Germans are that they are generally low educated, dependent, and burdensome. Germany has had major difficulty with integrating many of its Turkish immigrants. This is primarily due to the generally low education levels of immigrant Turks and the large language barrier that comes with it. Statistics show that Turks who know how to speak German, fall below 60% of the total immigrant population (Blashke, 2011). Tensions between native Germans and Turks can easily rise without the ability to communicate effectively. These lack of language skills are a major cause of the isolation of Turkish communities from the rest of Germany. Some Turkish communities in Bremen, such as Grӧpelingen, are so isolated that there is little to no need to speak German at all. They are filled with Turkish stores, restaurants, and other businesses that only service Turks. Lack of language skills often causes children of Turkish decent to fall behind in education. Germany has 3 core high school tracks, the highest being Gymnasium which is the one required to move on to university education (Blashke, 2011). According to Blashke “…there are only 16% of Turkish origin children who can make it to the top track, comparing to the 39% of native German children” (Blashke, 2011). The …show more content…
Since the second world-war Germany has become one of the most economically sound countries on Earth. With prosperous cities such as Berlin or Dresden, it is only natural that many peoples would attempt to immigrate, especially to large cities, in order to create a better lifestyle for themselves. Since the end of Nazism around WWII, Germany has offered asylum to refugees and immigrants liberally. This is mainly due to the atrocities of the holocaust and Germany trying to improve its reputation. However, recent abuse of these benefits has raised great concern with German citizens. Since the 80’s, Germany has received the largest number of asylum seekers and refugees (Rotte, 2000). Many Germans fear what they call “asylum abusers” or those who have fled to a host nation as a refugee but is living off of government benefits. According to Faiola, Germany has had a 60 percent increase in asylum seekers in only one year, “Germany alone received over 200,000 new asylum applications in 2014 — a 60 percent jump from a year earlier” (Faiola, 2015). Asylum abuse is common with immigrants into Germany that live off of their welfare system called Hartz IV. Hartz IV is basically described as any German citizen who is jobless and cannot

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