Effects Of Humanization Of The Kite Runner

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Many negative thoughts come to mind when the typical American hears the words “Afghanistan”, “the Middle East”, and “Muslim”. Generally, if he has lived long enough, he will automatically recall the fall of the twin towers on 9/11 and the many slurs used against people of Middle-Eastern decent. The words “terrorist”, “extremist”, and “heathen” were, and still are, often used by many Americans to describe these people. Despite all the attention that the country of Afghanistan has gained, not many people have stopped to think of the troubles that the Afghans themselves have faced. With his novel The Kite Runner, Khaled Hosseini not only provides an educational and eye-opening account of a country 's political chaos, but he also creates sympathy …show more content…
As stated by Harold McNeil’s review of Hosseini and his novel, Amir lives his childhood throughout many historical events that changed Afghanistan, such as the fall of the monarchy following the Soviet invasion and the immigration of Afghan refugees to Pakistan and the U.S. (2). In the first few chapters of The Kite Runner, Amir tells of the peaceful years he enjoyed with Hassan as a child. However, this tranquil time in Amir’s life does not last for long. On July 17, 1973, Afghanistan, and his life, changes drastically. “Something roared like thunder. The earth shook a little and we heard the rat-a-tat-tat of gunfire…” (Hosseini 38). This night is the beginning of the fall of the monarchy in Afghanistan, and beginning of many troubles that Amir goes through in the novel. In 1978, Communists took control of Afghanistan’s government with the help of the Soviet Union. Many of the Afghans who opposed the communist takeover were either arrested or killed. The war continued through the 1980’s, and the Soviets eventually left the country in 1989; about two million Afghans were killed by the end of the war, and over five million more immigrated to Iran, Pakistan, and the United States (Burgan 24). The war left devastating effects on the people of Afghanistan, both physically and mentally. The thoughts and feelings of Amir on these events in The Kite Runner portray a more personal side …show more content…
Not only does the novel provide a chronological account of the radical events that transformed Afghanistan, but it also reveals a personal side to the plight of its people. Although most American students who read this novel may not be able to closely relate to the specific historical events in Kabul, a humanization of Afghans can be seen through the personal experiences of Amir, Hassan, and the author himself. Through Khaled Hosseini’s The Kite Runner, people around the globe have become more sympathetic and understanding towards Afghans. Therefore, they are becoming seen more as people, and not as the extremists whom mostly everyone makes them out to

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